When Teresa Garcia's children started school, she often felt lost in translation. Her campaign for improved language services helped break down barriers for English-learner families.


The number of English-as-a-second-language speakers in public schools is on the rise, but recent research shows that the quality of education for those students in many K-12 schools is falling short.


The comments come at a time when more foreign-born black people live in the United States than at any time in history—and many of the residents are children enrolled in the nation's K-12 public schools.


What do English-learners need to succeed? A Washington-based think tank examines what states can learn from Illinois' efforts to find out what drives or derails ELL achievement.


A federal judge ruled that the Department of Homeland Security must allow former Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals recipients to submit renewals for the program, which grants work permits and protection from deportation for 700,000 immigrants brought to the U.S. illegally as children.


Recent decisions by the Trump administration to remove temporary protected status, which grants immigrants to right to live and work in the United States legally, could force 400,000 people to leave the country or face deportation.


In 2017, Learning the Language blog readers were drawn to stories about foreign language education, the Trump administration's aggressive stance on immigration, and research that explored the benefits of bilingualism.


In five states, Arizona, Louisiana, Maryland, New York, and Virginia, fewer than 50 percent of English-language learners graduate high school in four years. Some states produced much better results.


Educators and researchers are questioning whether the increase in high school completion rates means the needs of those students are being better served in the nation's K-12 schools.


The new law overturns a nearly 15-year-old law that had eliminated bilingual education in most of the state's public schools.


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