A task force looking at how best to include English-language learners in the National Assessment of Educational Progress report that "targeted testing" might work well for that group of students, according to Curriculum Matters.


With Sonia Sotomayor's confirmation as a justice of the U.S. Supreme Court, it's possible that a "Sotomayor effect" on Latino education has begun.


Eduflack says that people shouldn't lose sight of the fact that while Los Angeles schools experienced a 17 percent decline in the dropout rate over the course of one year, the dropout rate is still 26.4 percent.


An article by Larry Ferlazzo, a teacher of English-language learners at Luther Burbank High School in California, published today by Teacher Magazine is not only about Ferlazzo's experiences in visiting the homes of some of his students. It's also about how the Sacramento City Unified School District has partnered with its local teachers' union to support visits of teachers districtwide to their students' homes. It's called the Parent/Teacher Home Visit Project. Through the project, teachers are compensated for their time in making home visits. Now that's an innovation....


The summer edition of the Language-Learning Carnival has been posted.


Mary Ann Zehr of Learning the Language is tweeting. http://twitter.com/mazehr


The principal of Valley High School in Las Vegas says his school's graduation rate of 55 percent is inaccurate. One reason for the inaccuracy, he says, is that many of his school's students are Mexicans who go back and forth across the border, and are hard to track.


The unintended consequences of high-stakes testing and accountability systems for English-language learners outweigh any benefits that standardized tests might have for such students, argue Marcelo Suarez-Orozco and Corola Suarez-Orozco in an online editorial for the New York Times.


Juan Sepulveda, the director of the White House Initiative on Educational Excellence for Hispanic Americans, is taking an 18-state tour to hold a series of "community conversations" about Hispanic education.


A study in Germany found that if immigrant kids go to kindergarten, they are 25 percent more likely to take a pre-college track in education, according to Newsweek.


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