The Chronicle of Higher Education has published an analysis of the prospects of the Development, Relief, and Education for Alien Minors, or "DREAM," Act, which was reintroduced in Congress this spring and would provide a path to legalization for undocumented students who graduate from U.S. high schools. ImmigrationProf Blog notes that the article will be free to nonsubscribers to the publication for a few days. The article says there are "plenty of lawmakers who fiercely oppose the bill," but it "stands a good chance."...


About 8 percent of English-language learners in California, compared with 20 percent of students who aren't ELLs, finish high school having taken the required courses to be eligible to attend the California State University system, according to a study by WestEd released in a brief by the National High School Center. This is just one more statistic indicating that ELLs are disproportionately closed out of a curriculum that prepares them for college. The research brief reports on the course-taking patterns of ELLs based on a study of student transcripts from 54 high schools in California. A second brief released by ...


At a session at the annual meeting of the Education Writers Association, Amy Wilkins of the Education Trust urged reporters to ask the following question about states' and school districts' plans for using federal stimulus funds: "Is it good for kids and why—and beyond that, which kids is it good for?" What's more, she said, reporters ought to be asking how the stimulus funds will benefit low-income students, students of color, and English-language learners. So during the Q&A time, I asked members of the panel—who included Michael Casserly of the Council of the Great City Schools ...


The California Department of Education's press release about English-language learners' scores on the state's English-proficiency test reads about the same as the press releases on students' scores on this test for the last several years, as I recall. The percentage of ELLs who score "proficient" in the language keeps rising, but a gap still exists between the scores and the proportion of students who are reclassified as fluent in English, and thus, no longer in need of special programs. A sizable gap exists as well between the scores of ELLs and native speakers of English, though the press release doesn't ...


Ann Harris, an elementary school librarian in Texas, posts a request in the comment section of my last blog entry: what resources are available to help school librarians find Spanish-language or bilingual books for children? After all, she writes, "I cannot talk students into a book that does not look interesting, no matter the quality." She's found one good source, Isabel Schon's International San Diego Library site, but would like to know of more blogs or web sites that have reviews of Spanish-language books for children and youths. Can anyone help her out? I'm curious, too, to know what advice ...


The National Council of La Raza marks El Dia De Los Ninos, adapted from a Mexican "children's day," today by releasing a statistical brief with data showing that Latinos aren't being served well by U.S. schools, "Missing Out: Latino Students in America's Schools." The National Latino Children's Institute in San Antonio, Texas, is celebrating with a public forum on health and education here in the nation's capital that includes information on how organizations can apply for federal stimulus funds. The American Library Association also celebrates El Dia De Los Ninos each year with a promotion for library services to ...


Blogger and social studies/English teacher Larry Ferlazzo works hard to help his English-language learners stay on top of the news. He posted this week examples of some of the reports English-language learners in his classroom put together about swine flu. (Scroll down to the bottom of the entry.) "I will tell to my family that we don't have to go to Mexico right now," writes Edgar in his report....


It doesn't surprise me that a new research brief says children of immigrants (ages 3 or 4) aren't as likely as children of native-born families to attend preschool in the United States. It fits with the trend that I've noted twice recently on this blog that Hispanic children are less likely to be enrolled in early-childhood programs than children of other racial and ethnic groups. After all, many immigrants are Hispanic. (Find a summary of the brief here.) But what is surprising is that in 12 states, 3- and 4-year-olds in immigrant families are about as likely, or more likely, ...


The Tamalpais Union High School District in California has fired an adult English-as-a-second-language teacher after he answered students' inquiries about some off-color English words, according to a story published this week in the Contra Costa Times. (Hat tip to TESOL in the News). Jack Lieberman, the teacher in question who taught at an adult school run by the high school district, says that after students inquired about some bad words, he talked with them about how to be careful in using words like "sheet" and "beach," because they sound similar to other off-color words. Reading this news story, I recalled ...


Five congressional staffers and at least one U.S. Department of Education official plan to soon participate in a two-day field trip to schools in the Rio Grande Valley of Texas to learn about the education of English-language learners. The trip, May 6-8, is to be led by the Washington-based American Youth Policy Forum and focuses on visits to schools that have a good reputation for serving high school ELLs, according to Sarah Hooker, a program associate for the AYPF who is organizing it. Thus, some of the people who help to shape policy in Congress and in the federal ...


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