Friday, Nov. 28, is the deadline for submissions to a blogging carnival on the education of English-language learners. Use this form for submissions. Look for a post of the eighth edition of this niche carnival, founded by Larry Ferlazzo, around noon on Monday, Dec. 1. I'm taking a break for the Thanksgiving holiday and will be back to blogging on that day. Happy Thanksgiving!...


Staff of the U.S. Department of Education are scheduled to answer questions about permissible uses of Title III funds at a webinar on Dec. 11 hosted by the National Clearinghouse for English Language Acquisition. Title III is the section of the No Child Left Behind Act that authorizes funds for English-language acquisition programs. But the money may not be used in place of money from other local, state, or federal sources that would otherwise be spent on programs for ELLs. It's a tricky matter. The webinar will take place from 2 p.m. to 3 p.m. Eastern Standard ...


Arizona Governor Janet Napolitano has been a key figure in the long-standing controversy in Arizona over how to provide adequate funding for the education of English-language learners in the state. So when I heard that President-elect Barack Obama reportedly was picking her to head the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, I wondered what her absence in Arizona might mean for Flores v. Arizona, the federal lawsuit regarding funding for ELLs. If Ms. Napolitano, a Democrat, leaves her post as governor, the next person in line for the job is Arizona's secretary of state, Jan Brewer, who is a Republican. ...


Most teachers in Indiana assigned to teach English as a second language don't hold a certification in the subject, according to an article published in the Journal Gazette of Fort Wayne, Ind. Under new guidelines in 2006, Indiana requires teachers who teach English as a second language to students in middle or high school to hold a certification in the subject. Elementary school teachers who teach ESL, however, aren't required to have training to work with English-language learners. And many teachers assigned to teach ESL who were hired before 2006 don't have a certification in the subject. The Nov. 23 ...


I hope you've had a chance to read my reports on this blog of what officials from the U.S. Department of Education have been saying about the "supplement-not-supplant" provision of Title III, the section of the No Child Left Behind Act that authorizes funds for English-language-acquisition programs. The provision says that money from Title III can't be used in place of money from local, state, or federal sources that would otherwise be spent on ELLs. Andrew Brownstein of Thompson Publishing Group has recently posted a report on the same topic, "Title III Supplanting Provisions Draw Questions." (Hat tip to ...


The National School Boards Association has mentioned English-language learners in a plan for education that it submitted to President-elect Barack Obama's advisers. In its recommendations for how to "fix" the No Child Left Behind Act, the plan says: "Ensure high-quality, valid and reliable assessments for all students, especially for English-language learners and students with disabilities." English-language learners are also listed as among "those with the greatest needs" in terms of funding priorities for federal and state governments....


The November issue of The Sun focuses on immigration. The stories submitted by readers in the "Readers Write" section have a very strong emotional quality. (Hat tip to ImmigrationProf Blog.)...


Thirty-one Nobel Peace Prize winners have signed a letter calling for governments and "other parties to armed conflict" to respect schools as places of peace and safety for children. The letter (update: click on the link in the press release) calls for world leaders to ensure that children can learn free from intimidation or recruitment into the armed forces. It asks that governments make sure children have access to high-quality schooling regardless of their ethnicity, religion, or language. See the BBC's take here. This letter is relevant to educators of English-language learners in the United States because many immigrant children ...


The National Center for Family Literacy has announced that it will expand its family literacy centers for Hispanic and immigrant families to five new cities. They are: Las Vegas, Las Cruces, N.M.; Long Beach, Calif.; Memphis, Tenn.; and Springdale, Ark. The center already operates family literacy centers in 20 cities in partnership with Toyota. Sharon Darling, the founder of the National Center for Family Literacy, which is based in Louisville, Ky., explained to me that through the program parents typically spend several half-days per week at their child's school. The program targets parents of children in kindergarten through 3rd ...


The U.S. Department of State is planning to create an on-line program to help disadvantaged youths outside of the United States learn English, according to a summary of the project posted by TESOL in the News. The program will be free. I hope that ELLs living in the United States will also be able to access it. The U.S. Department of Education just released an online program, USALearns, designed for adult ELLs living inside the United States to learn English. Larry Ferlazzo says his high school ELLs have found it engaging....


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