The Women's Sports Foundation has documented through survey responses that immigrant girls are much less likely than girls who aren't immigrants to this country to participate in organized sports. This comes as no surprise, but not many organizations apparently go around asking the question. A report, "Go Out and Play," released by the foundation today, says that 43 percent of immigrant girls in families surveyed participate in organized sports, while 65 percent of girls in non-immigrant families surveyed do. The report defines an "immigrant family" as one in which at least one of the parents is born outside of the ...


From news coverage of the campaign trail, I conclude that the presidential candidates aren't talking about how best to educate English-language learners. And they are hardly raising the topic of immigration at all on the trail, except through ads in the Spanish-language media. But that hasn't stopped the Education Watch of the New York Times from featuring bilingual education, which Sen. Barack Obama publicly endorsed months ago, as a campaign issue. This week the New York Times followed up on the two commentaries it published recently on the issue with an opinion by Sandra Tsing Loh, a Los Angeles writer. ...


Schools "may" want to invest in bilingual or dual-language programs—"even if they appear costly," writes an adjunct law professor from Brigham Young University in Provo, Utah, in School Business Affairs. The professor is Scott Ellis Ferrin, who also chairs the department of educational leadership and foundations at that university. The article appears in the October issue of the magazine, which hasn't yet been posted online (some articles will be free and others not). Here's an excerpt of Mr. Ferrin's article, which offers a lukewarm endorsement of bilingual education. Educators are often told by policy makers and opinion polls that,...


The Southern Poverty Law Center in Montgomery, Ala., is soon to release a video that profiles Cesar Chavez, the activist who led a strike and grape boycott among farm workers in the 1960s. It's called "Viva La Causa: The Story of Cesar Chavez and the Great Movement for Social Justice." I often come across schools that are named after Cesar Chavez, and I have to wonder if those schools have educated their students about him. Numerous times I've interviewed students who attend a school named after some guy (usually a guy), but they can't tell me anything about that person. ...


On the heels of the release of the graphic about immigration, "What Part of Illegal Immigration Don't You Understand?," from Reason Magazine, comes this graphic "GOOD Sheet: Coming to America," produced in cooperation with Starbucks. GOOD bills itself as "a collaboration of individuals, businesses, and nonprofits pushing the world forward." Starbucks is backing a free paper published by Good in its stores, which tackles one election issue per week. In this case, the issue is immigration. I don't know enough about immigration law to fact-check the graphics for you. But the Quick and Ed hasn't been very impressed with the ...


Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's English Dictionary had been released. It delivers on a promise contained in its promotional materials that it would describe a great deal of English idioms. It lists and explains, for example, 23 English idioms that use the word "hell," none of which, by the way, would have been considered acceptable in the English-speaking household I grew up in, where we generally didn't use emphatic language at all. But if you are learning English and want to understand other folks, you have to know what these words, mean, right? Here are a few excerpts from the "hell" list. ...


Alabama has joined North Carolina in deciding not to admit undocumented immigrants to community colleges. The policy will go into effect next spring, according to a Sept. 26 Associated Press article. The Alabama state board of education approved the policy on Sept. 26. Last May North Carolina barred undocumented students from community colleges and decided to stick with that policy even after it received clarification from the federal government that it could go either way: admit or not admit them. South Carolina has enacted a law saying undocumented students can't be admitted to ANY state colleges. And Arkansas education officials ...


The number of undocumented immigrants coming to the United States has slowed, according to a Pew Hispanic Center report released today. The report, "Trends in Unauthorized Immigration: Undocumented Inflow Now Trails Legal Inflow," says that 800,000 undocumented immigrants were coming to the United States on average per year from 2000 to 2004. But from 2005 to 2008, the annual average fell to 500,000, with a decrease from year to year. The report says that 11.9 million undocumented immigrants live in the United States. It also says that from 2005 to 2008, it was no longer the case ...


Click on over to Larry Ferlazzo's Websites of the Day to view the 7th edition of the ELL/ESL/EFL Blog Carnival. Mr. Ferlazzo is the founder of the carnival. The list of contributors for this niche blog carnival (what doesn't have a niche on the Internet?) is growing. This edition includes some practical ideas for teachers of English-language learners, such as a tip from David Deubelbeiss at EFL Classroom 2.0 for helping students to learn a language: "Make it necessary." The "teensvoices" project featured in the submission by Challenge Language School Blog, in which students around the world ...


A nonprofit organization in Oregon paid 23 ordinary Oregonians $150 a day to be bombarded with facts about English-language learners—and to come up with a recommendation on whether their fellow Oregonians should vote "yes" or "no" for a state ballot initiative that would affect such students. The Oregonian reports that 14 members of the panel recommend a "no" vote on Measure 58. If passed, the measure would put a limit on the amount of time English-language learners can receive instruction in their native languages. The measure says the limit for high school students would be two years; for elementary...


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