English-language learners frequently move back and forth between the Pawtucket and Central Falls school districts in Rhode Island. So it makes sense that teachers in both districts worked together to write a curriculum for English-language learners that is now being used in both school districts. Read the article I wrote about this cooperative effort, which was guided by Nancy Cloud, a teacher-educator at Rhode Island College, at www.edweek.org....


At the start of this school year, the Montezuma-Cortez School District in Colorado had 855 English-language learners. By January, the number of ELLs had dropped to 320. I read this bit of news in the Cortez Journal (via Colorin Colorado) last month and wondered: How could this be? I chatted by telephone with Donetta Dehart, the English-language-acquisition coordinator for the Montezuma-Cortez school system, and a couple of officials from the Colorado department of education. They told me a demographic shift hadn't occurred. Rather, the 2,800-student district, after being audited by state officials, merely revamped how it identified English-language learners. ...


Children from migrant families are vulnerable in this country to having their human rights violated, according to a report released last month by the United Nations. (Click here for the link to download the 27-page report, which is at the top of the list. Choose "E" for English.) About a year ago, Jorge Bustamante, the Special Rapporteur on the human rights of migrants for the United Nations, visited the United States to investigate the effects of U.S. immigration policy and procedures on migrants, including children. (See my earlier posts, "New Yorker Reporter Writes about Hutto, From the Outside," and "U.N....


I know that I've been making too many posts about immigration lately rather than the education of English-language learners, which is the true subject of this blog. But I can't resist pointing you to this fascinating story published April 4 in the Los Angeles Times about the man who created the image of a family on the run posted on road signs near the U.S.-Mexico border. It's become a visual symbol of illegal immigration in this country. (I came across the story on ImmigrationProf Blog.) What's the school angle on this blog entry? I think it's the kind ...


Some immigrant children have to grow up fast when they come to the United States. Dorina Arapi, who moved to the United States from Albania as a child, writes how the two hours she cared for her younger brother each day while her mother worked seemed like 200 hours. Also, she says in a student essay featured by an Eduwonk post yesterday that she was looking up words in a dictionary and otherwise perfecting her English while other 8-year-olds rode their bikes and went to the park. "I felt I was an adult before I was a kid," she writes. ...


In another act of the drama in Arizona regarding how the state will adequately pay for the education of English-language learners, the Arizona House has approved a bill to increase spending for such students by $40 million next year. See "House OKs English-language instruction," published today in the Arizona Republic. The Arizona Senate is expected to vote on the bill today. The bill is legislators' latest effort to respond to a federal court mandate in Flores v. Arizona to provide sufficient funds for ELLs in the state. See "Arizona Still Grappling With Order on Adequate Funding for ELLs" for my ...


The actress and refugee advocate Angelina Jolie was in town yesterday to call for more support for the education of Iraqi children. She said that the United States and international community need to make it a higher priority to ensure that Iraqi children and children in other war-torn countries get an education. See "Angelina Jolie Highlights Iraqi Students' Plight," which was posted today at www.edweek.org. Ms. Jolie also cited some recent figures for the rate that the United States is accepting Iraqi refugees and urged the U.S. to pick up the pace of admitting people who have ...


I'm not much of a T.V. watcher, so I haven't tuned into a series about immigration that CBS News began Monday. ImmigrationProf Blog has the synopsis. CBS News has also posted a couple of stories related to the series, here and here. But I destroyed several tissues watching the film Under the Same Moon (La Misma Luna) last weekend about a 9-year-old Mexican boy's illegal crossing of the U.S.-Mexico border and search for his mother. The angst that the mother and child felt because of their separation really struck an emotional chord with me. (I found the ...


This Week in Education and Detentionslip.org have picked up on an April 7 story that says school cafeteria workers in Seminole County, Fla., were told they can't speak Spanish on the job. I've written for Education Week about incidents where students were told they couldn't speak Spanish in certain school settings. In all the cases I've heard about, school administrators have backed down on their stance after Hispanic advocacy or other groups contended that a ban on students' native language is discrimination. I'll keep an eye on whether the school administrators in Seminole County will do the same....


Panelists and participants at the annual meeting of TESOL in New York City last week had more questions than answers on how to meet the needs of long-term English-language learners. Kate Menken, an assistant professor of linguistics at Queens College of the City University of New York, noted at a session on high school reform that most programs serve the first of three groups of English-language learners that she's identified, newly arrived immigrants. But services are also needed for two other groups: immigrants with interrupted schooling, and long-term ELLs. In fact, she contended, educators "know next to nothing" about long-term ...


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