Several of Education Week's blogs, including Learning the Language, have received "excellent" ratings from a company called Blogged.com. I received an e-mail message from a marketing person from the company saying my blog had been given a 9.5 score out of 10 by editors who evaluated my blog according to frequency of updates, relevance of content, site design, and writing style. According to Webware: Cool Web 2.0 Apps for Everyone, Blogged.com is a blog rating service that launched on Feb. 25. The "About Us" section of blogged.com says it has a database of more than ...


Over the weekend, I traveled to Memphis to give a speech about trends in the education of English-language learners. I spoke during a luncheon at the annual conference of the Tennessee Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages. Here are the trends that I talked about: --More immigrant families are moving to small-town or rural communities that haven't received many immigrants for at least a century. (I noted that some school districts in those small towns and rural areas do a good job of quickly putting programs in place to serve English-language learners while others don't.) --The federal No ...


I draw your attention to the reporting project that took me to Amman, Jordan, for 10 days: "The Lost Years: Iraqi Students in Jordan," a collection of photos, videos, and an in-depth article about Iraqi refugees. It was published this week by Education Week. The project isn't, of course, about English-language learners in the United States—the subject of this blog—but many of the nation's ELLs are refugees and the piece might give you some insight into issues affecting displaced people in general. What was most surprising to me in reporting for this project was that so many Iraqi...


Geraldo Rivera, the T.V. star who hosts a show on Fox News, has written a book, His Panic: Why Americans Fear Hispanics in the U.S. He argues that the U.S. Congress should provide a path to legalization for the 12 million people in this country lacking residency or citizenship papers. He writes: "Who but the most eager and hardy can walk across forty or fifty miles of parched desert, dodge dopers, coyotes, and the feds, endure hardship and risk life and limb just to get a job at the other end of a gauntlet of discomfort and ...


Radio Arte, a public radio station in the Pilson neighborhood of Chicago, is putting young Latinos' voices on the air. Martin Macias, who is 18, broadcast a commentary, "How to Get My Vote," on Radio Arte that was picked up last month by National Public Radio. "In Chicago, immigration reform is the hottest issue," Martin says in his radio commentary. "My people want to know if mass deportation is the kind of radical change that comes with a new president. We don't support it." He also informs the radio audience that candidates better not assume any more that Latinos don't ...


Some teachers at Roswell High School and members of the Roswell, N.M., community are still upset over how a high school senior was sent back to Mexico three months ago after a local policeman assigned to the school ticketed her for driving without a license. A March 4 article published by the Associated Press provides details not reported earlier about the debate in that community over whether it was appropriate for a police officer to call immigration authorities to a school campus. See "New Mexico Teen Detained at School and Deported." For an Education Week article on the subject ...


Some researchers have tried to figure out how much one can increase one's salary by mastering a foreign language, according to a Feb. 28 article posted at ABC News. The article, "Learn a Language, Get a Raise," cites research by Aimee Chin, an associate professor in the economics department at the University of Houston, that found immigrants to the U.S. who transition from speaking English "well" to "very well" increase their wages by 30 percent. (That's a statistic some of you teachers might want to show your English-language learners who are trying to move to an advanced level of ...


Let me point you to a couple of reports released this winter that synthesize some of the research out there on English-learners. I had hoped to go back to some of the original research to further investigate some of those conclusions. But the morning hours are slipping away, so I'll leave that for another day. "Challenging Common Myths About Young English Language Learners," by Linda M. Espinosa, is a policy brief of the New York City-based Foundation for Child Development. Here's one of the myths stated in the paper: "Latino English-language learners are less likely to be enrolled in pre-kindergarten ...


The administrators of the Diamond Lake School District 76 in Mundelein, Ill., don't want to have to provide bilingual education, even though Illinois requires it when a school district has at least 20 students who speak a language other than English, according to a Feb. 27 article in the Chicago Tribune. In "Mundelein District Challenges State Over Bilingual Education," the administrators of Diamond Lake contend that a decision to provide instruction almost entirely in English in 2003 has led to improved test scores. The state just learned in a review last spring that the school district had made the switch ...


Arizona legislators filed papers in U.S. District Court in Tucson yesterday asking the court to give them more time to come up with a way to adequately pay for the education of English-language learners, according to a Feb. 28 article by the East Valley Tribune and an article published today in the Arizona Republic. The court had given the Arizona legislature a March 4 deadline in the long-running Flores v. Arizona case. Timothy Hogan, the attorney for the plaintiffs, is quoted in the articles as saying he's willing to give the legislature an extra two weeks, but not more ...


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