Alexander Russo's post today on This Week in Education piqued my interest regarding how the Virginia Department of Education is instructing school administrators to include English-language learners in testing this spring. I've previously noted that after several Virginia school districts put up a good fight in defiance of a federal mandate to give the state's regular reading test to beginning English-language learners this school year, the districts now have agreed to comply with the requirement. The writers of an editorial published in the Washington Post today opined that the Virginia districts did the right thing by backing down. I got ...


It may seem obvious that immigrant youths who are "out of school" aren't going to get much educational help, but a couple of researchers at the Public Policy Institute of California suggest in a research brief and study that educators should try to figure out how to reach such youths anyway. The researchers define out-of-school immigrant youths as young people ages 13-22 who are born abroad and don't have a high school diploma or a General Educational Development certificate. They note that the mission of the federal migrant education program officially expanded in recent years to include out-of-school immigrant youths. ...


Most presenters at a session about the impact of the No Child Left Behind Act on English-language learners at an American Educational Research Association meeting in Chicago April 9-13 were sharply critical of the federal education law, according to their slide presentations from that meeting that have been posted by the Institute for Language and Education Policy. For example, in his case study about two Cambodian 5th graders who take the regular math test of Texas after attending U.S. schools for 6 months, Wayne E. Wright, an assistant professor in bicultural-bilingual studies at the University of Texas, San Antonio, ...


Three months after the Fairfax County, Va., school board passed a resolution permitting administrators to defy a federal requirement to give the regular reading test to some beginning English-language learners, school officials have announced a turnaround on that position, according to an article today in the Washington Post. [Update follows.] Spokesmen from the Arlington and Loudoun County school systems in Virginia told me today that their school districts, which had also resisted the federal mandate, have also decided to comply with it. Fairfax County Superintendent Jack D. Dale told principals that they should follow federal requirements and use the test ...


When the staff of the U.S. Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions, convened a meeting on English-language learners and reauthorization of the No Child Left Behind Act recently, they invited two of the same five people who had testified last month before a subcommittee of the U.S. House of Representatives. Those two were Cornelia M. Ashby, from the Government Accountability Office, and Peter Zamora, the co-chair of the Hispanic Education Coalition. The meeting was April 10. But the Senate staff also chose two panelists who hadn't yet made presentations on Capitol Hill regarding reauthorization of NCLB. ...


The U.S. Department of Education, which is in a tug-of-war with several Virginia superintendents who are protesting a federal mandate to change how their school districts test beginning English-language learners, met with those chiefs on April 13 to discuss the impasse. Maria Glod, of the Washington Post, reported in an April 14 article that a solution wasn't reached. The Virginia superintendents and school boards resisting the mandate will have to decide soon what they will do for the spring testing season. Paul Regnier, a spokesman for Fairfax County schools, which could lose $17 million in federal funds if it ...


The U.S. Department of Education has posted descriptions of some of the guides it expects to have ready this summer for states to better include English-language learners in large-scale testing. The guide for native language assessments, for example, is expected to answer such questions as "When do the numbers justify the cost?" and "What states have the most experience in using native language assessments?" More information from the Education Department on the LEP Partnership, an initiative of the federal government to help states on testing issues for English-language learners, is available here. Also, see my March 15, 2007, post "Who's...


One year after students from immigrant families organized school walkouts to protest some of the proposals in the U.S. Congress to change federal immigration laws, most of those students aren't doing the same this spring. In a March 26 article, the Dallas Morning News noted how Gustavo Jimenez, who organized walkouts among fellow high schoolers last spring, has been concentrating on finishing his senior year, working a part-time job at J.C. Penney, and making plans to attend a community college in the fall. He has continued his interest in activism, though, by lobbying for passage of the DREAM ...


A new research brief about children in immigrant families contains some interesting observations that indicate education policy can make a difference in whether children of Mexican heritage go to preschool. The researchers from the State University of New York at Albany who wrote the brief say that in Mexico, where preschool is free, 81 percent of 4-year-olds were enrolled in preschool in 2005. By contrast, in 2004, 55 percent of children in Mexican immigrant families living in the United States participated in preschool. (Preschool is NOT free in most places in the United States, though the researchers don't say this ...


A bill that would require Colorado students, starting in the graduating class of 2012, to show they are competent in English before they can get a high school diploma is working its way through the Colorado legislature. The Colorado Senate passed the bill, SB 73, on March 20, and it has been introduced and assigned to an education committee in the Colorado House. A March 20 article in the Rocky Mountain News tells about the bill, which requires each of the state's 178 school districts to decide how it will determine if its students have mastered English. Sen. Chris Romer, ...


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