The Every Student Succeeds Act could lead administrators in traditional high schools to turn away older English-learner students who may need additional time to earn their high school diplomas, a new report from the Migration Policy Institute argues.


The new analysis significantly increases the annual estimate of undocumented high school students earning diplomas that has long been used in debates about immigration and special protections for immigrant youth who were illegally brought to the U.S. as children.


A new survey from the Council of the Great City Schools reveals trends on English-learner enrollment, linguistic diversity, student achievement, professional development, and staffing in the nation's largest school districts.


A Washington-based think tank has released a guide to help school districts and states identify, develop, and hire bilingual educators in their own communities.


New legislation introduced in Florida, which educates more than 300,000 English-learners in public schools, would allow ELLs to take state tests in their native languages. The bill would allow school districts to bypass the state's Every Student Succeeds Act plan, but could face several hurdles to approval.


The proposal, designed to protect Dreamers and recipients of Temporary Protected Status, likely faces an uphill battle to win support this time around from the Republican-led U.S. Senate and President Donald Trump.


A group of prominent researchers on English-learners is forcefully challenging the findings of a recent working paper that posits that 3rd grade retention was a benefit to struggling English-learners in Florida.


The first products of a multi-district purchasing group that aims to improve curricula for English-learners are middle school math materials, designed with the goal of preparing more ELLs to take Algebra I by 9th grade.


If the "Protect Sensitive Locations Act" law gains traction in Congress, the legislation may not fully clear up confusion around the obligations that schools must balance when dealing with immigration agents: ensuring the safety and privacy of their students while still cooperating with federal officials.


In a nearly three-minute video, a pair of veteran ELL teachers outline advice on how educators can identify students' individual strengths, needs, and interests and develop lesson plans that are accessible to all English-learners.


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