As supporters of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program celebrate a victory in court, another lawsuit looms on the horizon. The outcome in all DACA-related cases directly impacts K-12 schools.


The answer is unclear but "the threat is real," English-language-learner advocacy groups say. The advocates say the Education Department has evaded their questions about the future of the office of English-language acquisition.


Forty-three states and the District of Columbia offer special recognition for high school graduates who demonstrate fluency in two or more languages. Just a handful of mostly rural states have yet to be swept up in the movement.


While most state-run programs do have policies in place to support young ELLs, the guidelines vary widely in quantity and quality, a new National Institute for Early Education Research report found.


A lawsuit claimed that the school district and outgoing Superintendent Tommy Chang have a "disturbing practice" of handing over student information to immigration authorities. Chang, an immigrant himself, fires back.


The Migration Policy Institute published the first in a series of reports that aim to educate parents, policymakers, and the public about how to find and use data to examine whether schools are adequately serving their English-language-learner students.


More than half of states' ESSA plans intentionally set lower academic goals for English-learners, at least seven states have plans that flout key provisions of the federal education law, and nearly 20 percent of state plans allow schools to earn high ratings even if ELLs are struggling, according to new policy briefs.


Despite their concerns, the U.S. Department of Education seems ready to forge ahead with plans to scrap the office of English-language acquisition.


While schools must protect the rights and privacy of undocumented students, officials also must cooperate with federal officials in some instances.


The proposed consolidation of the office of English-language acquisition is sparking strong pushback from advocates for English-learners, the fastest growing subgroup of students in public schools.


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