Colorin Colorado launches new blog that will focus exclusively on the new common core standards and English-language learners


A parenting practices program that targets Latino families is showing promising results, a new University of California, Berkeley research brief finds.


Springdale, Ark., district hopes to lure up to 100 bilingual graduates back as classroom teachers.


A new edweek.org collection of content features stories on new ELL training for core-content teachers and growing popularity of dual language programs.


A new report from the Migration Policy Institute reveals numerous factors in black immigrant families that lead to school success in the early years for their children.


Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney said young undocumented immigrants who've been granted relief from deportation and received legal work permits would not be deported if he wins the White House.


Dissatisfied with the achievement levels for English-learners, state education leaders highlight plans to improve instructional programs for the state's roughly 60,000 such students.


From guest blogger Kimberly Shannon United We Dream, an immigrant youth-led network, is expanding its efforts to assist and inform aspiring citizens who are interested in the Department of Homeland Security's Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals . In addition to in-person clinics and webinars, the network has partnered with legal service organizations to create English and Spanish websites—WeOwnTheDream.org, and UneteAlSueno.org—where so-called DREAMers can find information about deferred action and can conduct a free online assessment to see if they are eligible. The network is also setting up a text-messaging system and has a phone hotline to keep ...


The Council of Chief State School Officers releases a new guide meant to help states ensure that their English-language proficiency standards for English-learners correspond to the Common Core State Standards and the Next Generation Science Standards.


The U.S. Department of Education this afternoon announced that the state education agency in Oregon has won a $6.3 million grant to create a new English-language proficiency test that will measure the language demands of the common standards. Oregon is actually the lead state in a group of 12—including the ELL-rich states of California and Florida—that will develop the assessments used to annually measure how English-language learners are progressing toward proficiency. The other states in the group are Arkansas, Iowa, Kansas, Louisiana, Nebraska, Ohio, South Carolina, Washington, and West Virginia. Oregon's key non-state partners in this ...


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