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Immediate Feedback

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If time on task and extensive practice are key building blocks for learning, then educators need to take a closer look at the power of video games, especially their ability to provide immediate error feedback, according to a March 31 entry in the blog, Explorations in Learning.

The writer suggests that there is much to be learned from video games if students are motivated to spend hours on particular tasks and make adjustments based on error feedback.

The entry includes a useful and interesting piece from Wired Magazine, "High Score Education: Games, Not School, Are Teaching Kids to Think," as well some thoughts about the link between motivation and the "learning flow" theory of Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi.

2 Comments

For Kevin Bushweller, although I don’t profess to have all the answers on how to motivate students to do better in school, I do recognize that if you can capitalize on their interests and refuse to compromise on the educational component you will have a great combination. For example, if your 8 year-old is interested in video games and needs to learn his multiplication tables your answer is Timez Attack. Timez Attack is a video game that is as entertaining as a Playstation game (capitalize on interest) and teaches children multiplication mastery (education focus). There is a base version you can get for free at www.bigbrainz.com.

Find what works, what’s motivating, and then look for resources that will support the entertainment and educational needs.

I do recognize that if you can capitalize on their interests and refuse to compromise on the educational component you will have a great combination. For example, if your 8 year-old is interested in video games and needs to learn his multiplication tables your answer is Timez Attack.

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