Yesterday, I read an essay published in the Hoover Digest, written by Diane Ravitch. In the essay, Ravitch, whose well-defined ideas on education you can find on her Bridging Differences blog, says that we are quick to blame teachers for low international test scores and poorly performing schools, but we rarely point to the students and their "slacker" attitude towards school when thinking about reform. It's really an excellent essay, and I highly recommend that you read the whole thing, but here's an excerpt just for reference's sake: Next time there is a conference about the state of American education--or ...


I'm not one to hold grudges, but my college application process was one of the most stressful and disappointing experiences in my recent memory. Despite four years of extracurricular activities, volunteer work, college-level classes, and loads of homework, I was still rejected from my first-choice school. Afterwards, I felt that if I had chosen to take a less-rigorous curriculum during high school, I would have had higher grades, and consequently, a higher class rank, which may have resulted in an acceptance letter. Of course, that's all speculative, and some would just call me bitter, but I don't think I'm alone ...


I hope my 4-year-old daughter has the science genes and motivation to follow in the footsteps of this group of girls, who recently swept the prestigious Siemens high school science competition. This is the first time ever that girls have won all the grand prizes in the competition, according to this Associated Press story. This is great news for girls and maybe the stereotype that girls are not good at math and science is beginning to disappear. But the underside of these results is the question: What is the matter with the boys? Are they on the decline? As the ...


I can only imagine the whining that ensued when students in 10 Massachusetts schools were told that their school day would stretch from a 6-hour schedule to an 8- or 9-hour day. But the results are in, and according to this article in the Boston Globe, it's working. The students in schools with longer days scored higher on the MCAS--Massachusett's state-wide standardized test--in math, English, and science across all grade levels than students in schools with a normal schedule, according to a report released on Friday. It makes sense to me that being in school for a longer amount of ...


This op-ed in the Nov. 23 edition of the Christian Science Monitor offers pretty powerful advice on how to shut down "dropout factories" and increase high school graduation rates. Here's an excerpt: "The overwhelming number of dropouts surveyed in the report, "The Silent Epidemic: Perspectives of High School Dropouts," recognized that graduating is vital to their success. They told us they would have stayed on track to graduate if school had been more relevant, challenging, and supportive of their needs. They point the way toward reform – improved teaching and parental involvement to make school more engaging, a safe and orderly ...


I recently finished writing an article for the upcoming issue of Education Week's Digital Directions about the educational impact of Microsoft's Halo 3. It was probably one of the most interesting stories I've written so far, or at least one of the most enjoyable stories to research. Really, it just gave me an excuse to hang out with my Halo-playing friends and grill them about the ins and outs of the game. I, myself, have never played Halo. In fact, my experience with video games starts and stops with the original PlayStation, which I received for Christmas when I was ...


Written by Education Week's Katie Ash Recombining DNA and purifying proteins sound like experiments students in an upper-level college course would be doing, but researcher George Cachianes has brought those hands-on lessons to high school students, according to this recent New York Times article. Drawing on his success, high schools in surrounding areas now are using his biotech syllabus as a model for their own science classes, says the story. "Students are motivated by understanding the relationships between research, creativity and making money," says Cachianes. The way Cachianes balances the introduction of basic biotechnology concepts with engaging advanced lab work ...


Advertisement

Recent Comments

  • Reward Incentive Programs: Awesome!!! Nice write-up. In this present scenario of economic downturn read more
  • milan hotels: I believe that all schools should adapt to the citizen read more
  • best life coaching: I also disagree because motivation is needed everywhere and in read more
  • find a life coach: This is a good way of promoting arts and education read more
  • www.instituteforcoaching.com: citizen school is best schools for all over they motivation read more

Archives

Categories

Technorati

Technorati search

» Blogs that link here