It's good to count parent engagement and school climate, says Sonya Heisters. So, California has taken a step in the right direction with its new accountability system.


Alan Warhaftig writes that this year's Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium tests show Los Angeles Unified School District magnet schools outscoring charters. Charters did better with English Learners.

California's Local Control Funding Formula was announced under the banner of subsidiarity, but Arun Ramanathan argues that local control also means state responsibility.


The U. S. and Mexico share hundreds of thousands of students, but the barriers to educating them well are high, and the students are often unwelcomed in either country, writes John McDonald.


Los Angeles is locked in controversy about charter schools: more, fewer, none. That's the wrong discussion. Instead, we should be designing a truly 21st Century school system. Here are some design ideas.


A new poll from Policy Analysis for California and the University of Southern California shows that the state has a long way to go to keep its promise to engage local stakeholders in the state's historic education finance reforms, writes Daisy Gonzales


The California State Board of Education is poised to adopt a multiple indicator accountability system to replace the state's discredited single number score. Good! But it will work only if schools learn from using it.


It's traditional on Labor Day to assess the dismal state of unionism. But I find some bright spots for teacher unions in California, and the possibility of a brighter future.


Single measure accountability systems make 'soup' out of school achievement by putting all its ingredients into a mathematical blender, writes David Plank. The soup conceals more ingredients than it reveals.


I am starting to get the hang of Minecraft's basic controls and gaining a glimpse of why kids and some adults are excited about it. But what to do with the dead pigs?


The opinions expressed in On California are strictly those of the author(s) and do not reflect the opinions or endorsement of Editorial Projects in Education, or any of its publications.

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