Big districts get all the attention. Their leaders make headlines. They 100,000+ students; 10,000+ teachers. What they often don't have is the best results for students, writes Arun Ramanathan.


Superintendent Ramon Cortines ordered all schools in the Los Angeles Unified School District closed on Tuesday morning because of what he called a "credible" bomb threat. Let the second guessing begin.


After two years, California's sweeping finance and accountability laws remain a grand vision of linking educational goals to dollars and local democracy. But full implementation will take more time and a reaffirmation of the vision.


Neither side seems able to see beyond the trenches as the Los Angeles charter school war settles in for a long winter, maybe several of them. Also see links to other stories of note.


The No Child Left Behind Act is headed to the morgue. Its replacement follows California's lead into capacity building investments, multiple indicators, and localizing decisions.


We are wasting Black minds, argues Education Trust-West executive director Ryan Smith, who also points to places who are building success with African-American students.


California's Local Control Accountability Plans are beginning to look too much like Special Ed's Individual Education Plans, writes guest commentator Arun Ramanathan. Compliance is trumping educational substance.


Most of us, or our ancestors, came from somewhere else, and mostly we're thankful we did. We just have a hard time extending that gift to others.


By almost any measure, California ranks low in its support for K-12 education. Several tax proposals would help stabilize financing.


It may be possible to head off the looming charter school war, but peace needs a plan. My five-point scheme starts by understanding that all politics are local.


The opinions expressed in On California are strictly those of the author(s) and do not reflect the opinions or endorsement of Editorial Projects in Education, or any of its publications.

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