Charters and rich folk were made for each other. I've got nothing against either. But we need to get real about what kind of education system they would create.


Charter schools and the Los Angeles Unified School District don't have to act as adversaries, but each has to change, according to Robin Lake and Paul Hill.


International policy scholar Tom Luschei looks to Latin America for targeted interventions that work with students in poverty. Colombia's Escuela Nueva could benefit our children, he says.


In many ways California is a northern extension of Latin America, writes Tom Luschei. And it could learn a lot from Cuba.


California's bigger than many countries. International education scholar Tom Luschei begins a series of posts asking what kind of country would it be? Very unequal.


The question is not whether charters are good schools, but what they represent in the effort to reform and rebuild public education in California.


Reformers have sought to decentralize L.A. schools for nearly half a century. Outgoing Superintendent Ray Cortines is trying a new plan. How's it going?


The Common Core Standards require students to back their opinions with evidence, writes contributing blogger Alan Warhaftig. Why can't people believe evidence that shows L.A. public schools doing well?


The U.S. Supreme Court will hear a challenge to "fair share" agreements that require non-members to pay fees for teacher union representation. Constitutional law professor Catherine Fisk sees the challenge as unfair and the alternative of a "members only" union as unworkable.


A Broad Foundation plan to put half of L.A.'s students in charter schools intensifies the trench warfare over reform. If history is a guide, there will be no winners.


The opinions expressed in On California are strictly those of the author(s) and do not reflect the opinions or endorsement of Editorial Projects in Education, or any of its publications.

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