The Whitney Plantation is devoted exclusively to slavery. Expect to be moved, educated, horrified, and perhaps motivated.


The one-percenters who can make large campaign donations have more money than ever. And, as in all other policy areas these days, they want to call the shots in K-12 education.


The state's new funding formula illuminates the needs of foster youth. Early implementation finds reason for cautious optimism, but there is much work ahead.


There's a lot of talk these days about inequality in America, and the conversation often turns to education. Somehow, schools are supposed to create opportunity and fix inequality.


California's new finance and accountability system depends on local democracy. It turns a parent's role from choice to voice.


An irresistible computer game and a equally irresistible 7-year-old teach me about how we might link deeper learning and the Common Core.


Even more than we expected, incumbents in Los Angeles school board races failed to capture majorities. Three are headed toward runoffs. Charter supporters are ascendant as big money pours in.


Angelenos will pick a majority of the board members in the nation's second largest school district on Tuesday. A critical election? I think so.


Readers from outside the state may not know that the Public Policy Institute of California has just released its annual "California's Future" report. The K-12 section is worth a look.


The once-in-a-lifetime window of political opportunity that California teacher unions enjoy gives them time to build around the elemental changes facing teaching as an occupation. Scary and exciting!


The opinions expressed in On California are strictly those of the author(s) and do not reflect the opinions or endorsement of Editorial Projects in Education, or any of its publications.

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