Betsy DeVos' privatization agenda will become national policy. The California counter-narrative is creating a public system that improves itself.


Field trips are fun, but they are often difficult and too expensive. The California State Parks are using portable technology to allow students virtual access to tide pools, butterflies, and the gold rush, writes Brad Krey.


The script played out. Betsy DeVos has become the most vilified U.S. education secretary in history, and she just took the oath of office. But it's time to take her ideas and her politics seriously.


California is positioning itself to battle Donald Trump. Behind the war that will be fought out in the classrooms and the courts lies a starkly different idea of what America is and should be.


At more than 100 schools, teachers have gained substantial autonomy over the learning program, working conditions, personnel, and other domains. Here's what I learned by spending a weekend with them.


Teachers have been earning credits and credentials for generations, so the claim that new microcredentials will change professional development is likely to be met with some skepticism. But as Kristoffer Kohl writes they may be the next big thing.


Whether or not Twitter was the cause of the Trump presidency, it has changed politics. New research illustrates its power.


California public schools have enjoyed relatively good fiscal times lately, but the state still provides inadequate financing for education. Pat Reilly advocates boosting per pupil expenses.


Betsy DeVos' nomination to be U.S. Secretary of Education will illuminate what money buys in American politics. It is not just another battle between the education establishment and "reformers."


California wants to create a counter-narrative to the Trump Administration's social and economic policies, but the dependence on federal dollars portends a bumpy ride, as Scott Graves from the California Budget & Policy Center shows.


The opinions expressed in On California are strictly those of the author(s) and do not reflect the opinions or endorsement of Editorial Projects in Education, or any of its publications.

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