July 2014 Archives

Most schools have no way to combine the assessment information from multiple sources in ways that are useful for driving instructional improvement or managing student progress. While this seems to be an easy problem to solve, there appear to be four significant problems.


"Innovation in the public sector in general, and in education in particular, could be a major driver for significant welfare gains," says a new report from the OECD, Measuring Innovation in Education.


Local and state policy makers should enact pro-growth, pro-achievement, pro-employability, and pro-innovation policies to help boost achievement and innovation.


Good schools change communities by lifting expectations, reinforcing positive values, preparing thoughtful citizens, and building property values. That's why we feel so strongly about expanding access to quality schools.


How do we increase motivation, build persistence, support the transition into a more independent educational experience, and prepare for future success?


Released today, "Leading in an Era of Change: Making the Most of Course Access Programs," highlights policies and signals an important evolution in education.


What does it take to get students interested in learning entrepreneurial skills?


Schools are not sports teams. For students, education shouldn't be a zero-sum game among adults. It doesn't have to be. Adult labels can be put aside in favor of better schools for students.


We tend to think first about the needs of the system and create solutions from there. But what if we looked first to the needs of people, and then designed ways the system could meet its goals by serving these needs?


By: Stacey Childress. Pull mechanism refers to things like challenges, prizes, and advanced market commitments - ways of paying for innovations based on their actual performance. This in contrast to government agencies and philanthropists making upfront investments in design and development of solutions and then "pushing" them to buyers and users. A key idea is that some sort of coordinated action on the demand side - in this instance from schools, districts, and states - will create compelling reasons for suppliers to behave differently, better, more responsively.


The potential of technology to personalize learning, to boost achievement and to better equip learners to thrive in college and career is no secret. Yet, to realize this potential, kids must be connected.


By: Nick Donohue. Any good conversation about deep educational change naturally orbits back to ideas about communities and families. However, even lighter engagements -- homework help, teacher conferences and basic communications between home and school - prove elusive.


The opinions expressed in Vander Ark on Innovation are strictly those of the author(s) and do not reflect the opinions or endorsement of Editorial Projects in Education, or any of its publications.

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