President-elect Donald Trump's biggest education pitch during the presidential campaign was for a $20 billion voucher program that students could use at both public and private schools.


Eight states and 15 charter school networks are named the 2016 grant recipients of the federal Charter Schools Program.


The decision was based on how the voucher-like program is financed, not on the program itself, which is unprecedented in its scope.


The National Alliance for Public Charter Schools and the Black Alliance for Educational Options organized a group of 160 black educators, advocates, lawmakers and religious leaders to sign a letter to the NAACP.


"Providing quality information to clarify requirements and responsibilities—including adapting to emerging trends—is a key federal internal control," a Government Accountability Office report states.


"I see it as a way for children that are growing up in low-income families or in families that are below the poverty line to have a chance," Evan McMullin said in an interview.


A group of parents backed by organizations that include the Washington Education Association is challenging the latest iteration of Washington state's charter law.


School choice was a far larger topic at the Republican National Convention than it was at the Democratic gathering in Philadelphia last month.


Florida parents are attempting to raise funds to file a lawsuit so that 3rd graders won't be retained this year based on standardized tests.


New York state is allocating $20 million for initiatives to help boys and young men of color, including $6 million for school district family engagement programs this year.


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