The Time Magazine cover story this week is all about the time warp that American public schools are mired in. The article argues that schools need a complete overhaul to allow students to compete in the global marketplace, where skills like fluency in several languages, out of the box thinking, global awareness, and the ability to interpret complex data are all highly valued. But the article argues that those things are not being taught in public schools where the structure of teacher lecturing at the head of the class, students sitting in rows taking notes by hand has remained unchanged ...


Parents struggling to help their children with nightly math homework will be pleased to hear that the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics has released a report recommending that schools limit the mathematical concepts they introduce instead of inundating students with many math concepts that ultimately don’t stick. On this segment on NPR’s Talk of the Nation, Education Week’s math and science reporter Sean Cavanagh holds forth on the intent of the group’s recommendations and why where you go to school may determine what you learn. Francis “Skip” Fennell, president of the National Council of Teachers ...


It seems almost every month a new story comes out highlighting the increase of autism cases among children. The U.K.’s Observer features this poignant and personal description of a father trying to connect with his son despite the barrier of his son’s autism. As unlikely as it may sound, surfing was the way they broke through. If you’re looking for more hard data on the subject, Education Week takes a close and thorough look at the increase of autism among school-age children....


San Diego Union-Tribune columnist Ruben Navarrette Jr. expounds on why Latino students may have such a significant school drop-out rate in this essay. During a recent speech he said he had to explain some of the reasons for the high rate, even though Latino parents place such value on education. He cautions that there are no simple answers. Check out some of Mr. Navarrette’s other columns here....


If you’ve been anywhere near a high school lately (or even a middle school for that matter) you may have had trouble deciphering the slang coming from students who are actually speaking English. “Phat” doesn’t mean fat and “sick” doesn’t mean someone is vomiting. But over in England, teachers and other adults are struggling even harder to decode the speech of students born in the U.K. but whose families speak Punjabi, Urdu, or Hindi at home, according to TES Magazine. The new slang has been dubbed Hinglish and the magazine provides a primer on it for ...


While Al Gore’s documentary on global warming “An Inconvenient Truth” is required viewing for science students in Norway and Sweden, so far American students will still have to head to Blockbuster on their own to rent the film. According to this Washington Post opinion piece, the producers of the movie wanted to give 50,000 free DVDs to the National Science Teachers Association for distribution to schools as an educational tool, but their offer was turned down. The big reason, according to Laurie David, who wrote the article and is one of the movie’s producers, is the NSTA’s...


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