Want to know what your kids or your students are doing when they spend all that time on MySpace.com? Well, for anyone who’s a bit electronically uncool, U.S. News provides a lengthy primer on the Internet version of a social club. It includes tips for safe use of MySpace as well as a debate over whether to snoop or not when it comes to a teen’s MySpace page....


The venerable Weekly Reader classroom magazine not only looks updated this school year—with a new layout and eye-catching graphics—but a new study proves that it makes a difference in the classroom. The magazine, which each week makes its way to more than 90 percent of the school districts in the country, provides timely, kid-friendly discussions of current events and interesting stories, with different issues tailored to students of different ages. A recent study found that students who used Weekly Reader in their classroom showed significant improvement in learning and reading facts and vocabulary over students who didn’t....


Is the school publishing giant Scholastic bringing politics to the classroom? Liberal blogger Eric Boehlert thinks so—and not in a good way. Posting on the Huffington Post, Boehlert sketches the outlines of what he views as a conspiracy between network news giant ABC and Scholastic to bring a conservative point of view on Sept. 11 and the Iraq war to students everywhere. He (and others that he links to) blast ABC for their primetime mini-series “The Path to 9/11,” saying it contains falsehoods and blames the disaster in part on the Clinton administration. Apparently Scholastic and ABC have ...


Most students think they can rock out to music or watch television (or both) while they're studying, but researchers at UCLA suggest those types of study habits aren't as successful as hitting the books without the distractions. While the news may not make students happy, it gives parents and teachers more fodder for encouraging students to study without the electronics. The story is posted in The Washington Post's Health Section....


In a mix of business and the classroom, Blackboard Inc. has been awarded a patent for the software that delivers its e-learning products. But many in the growing online education community say the company didn’t create the techniques used to help students feel at home in a virtual classroom. Those who object to the patent are registering their disapproval in a very electronic way: by online petitions and contributing to a long Wikipedia entry tracing the rise of virtual learning all the way back to 1945. Posted on CNN. You can also check out the Wikipedia entry on the ...


In the current issue of Education Week, you can read Mary Ann Zehr’s story on the effect of a pull-back by the U.S. government when it comes to rebuilding Iraqi schools, but if you want more you can also listen to Mary Ann’s astute comments on the issue. All Things Considered’s Robert Siegel interviews Mary Ann, who shares her thoughts on the long-term effects that American assistance may or may not have on the Iraqi school system and regular Iraqi families. (NPR story requires media player.)...


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