There is still hope for evolution in the United States, but it is fading, writes Jeff Hecht in this feature from the New Scientist. Recent surveys indicate that less Americans believe in the theory today than did 20 years ago, and the number of fundamentalist Christians who oppose its inclusion in the education curriculum are growing. For proponents of evolution, these are troubled times. Hecht looks at how separation of church and state, freedom of speech, and freedom of religion—the bedrock of American history—are influencing this debate....


The U.S. Department of Education today released "peer review feedback and related information" on the teacher quality plans submitted by the 50 states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico that outline how each is complying with the NCLB mandate of having a "highly qualified teacher in every classrooms. "I asked states to show us how they plan to give students in their schools qualified instructors and I was encouraged by their feedback," Secreatary of Education Margaret Spellings was quoted on the department's press release....


Students in Virginia's Augusta County School District will be paying a little bit extra for their cheese burgers this fall, and it's all because of Oil. The rise in oil and gas prices over recent years has resulted in fuel surcharges being applied to a whole host of items that go into making Johnny's and Jane's noonday meal. Posted by National Public Radio. (Media player required.)...


You can add "The Ron Clark Story" to the list of based-on-a-true-story movies about teachers saving poor inner-city, minority kids from desperate life situations and failing grades. The made-for-TV movie that aired this past weekend tells the story of a young teacher from the rural south who takes a teaching job in Spanish Harlem. Ron Clark has since written a best-selling book of teaching techniques and will open his own academy in the fall of 2006. While the film received both good and bad reviews, this letter from one of Mr. Clark's former students, published in Reader's Digest, attests to ...


What began as a grade-fixing scheme in a Camden, N.J. high school is now a growing scandal, according to an August 11 story from NPR. The fixing scheme was first uncovered by Paula Veggian, a scheduler at Brimm Medical Arts High School, in 2004. However, a state investigation begun in early 2006 has since widened to include a former Superintendent and two other elementary school principals. Allegations include not only grade-fixing, but unauthorized expenses and bonuses as well. Results of the state's investigation expected any day, according to NPR....


We've all heard the typical high school sports stories about pushy parents who berate coaches and players on the sidelines, coaches who overcome great obstacles to motivate teams, or kids who achieve greatness in athletics under extraordinary circumstances. But, before the glory and triumph, what does it take to keep those athletes safe and healthy while on the field of battle? This article from the American School Boards Journal looks at the state of school sports programs, and what they need in terms of equipment, regulations, and leadership to be safe....


Advertisement

Recent Comments

  • shanae johnson: this need to get them selves to gether because our read more
  • Paul B.: Is this site up and running any more? read more
  • Charlene Younggren: I actually had a parent stalking the parking lot every read more
  • Katie Ward: I’m not sure I agree with Maria's comment that disengaged read more
  • Lindsey: This is very alarming to me considering that I teach read more

Archives

Categories

Technorati

Technorati search

» Blogs that link here