The Kansas City Star reports that schools are less frequently being named after historical figures and are instead becoming namesakes for geographical features or forces of nature. The article is based on this report out of the Manhattan Institute, that found that community leaders are no longer naming schools for Abraham Lincoln or George Washington or even more modern political figures. Instead the trend appears to be towards naming schools with nature in mind, like Windy Pointe or Sandy Springs....


As school districts try to interpret last week's U.S. Supreme Court decision on school desegregation, editorial pages across the country have offered the following opinions: The two major newspapers covering the districts in the case were split. The Seattle Times agreed with the decision; Kentucky's Lexington Herald-Leader said it was "supreme nonsense." Elsewhere, the San Fransisco Chronicle, the Los Angeles Times, the Minneapolis Star Tribune, and Raleigh's News & Observer minced no words in their opposition to the 5-4 decision. The Sacramento Bee and the St. Petersburg Times both called it a step backwards, and the St. Louis Post-Dispatch found ...


Though the U.S. Supreme Court today rejected school diversity plans that use race as a factor in the case involving voluntary integration plans in school districts in Louisville, Ky. and Seattle, the ruling didn't stop bloggers from opining about the Justices' opinion. In addition to Education Week's extensive coverage, check out SCOTUSblog which recaps the term-ending case and provides solid analysis. The NAACP's Legal Defense Fund school integration blog cites Justice Anthony M. Kennedy’s support of allowing school districts to pursue integrated schools despite his agreement in parts with the majority opinion. The Volokh Conspiracy also has plenty ...


Terry Gross, the host of NPR's Fresh Air, interviews two veteran Philadelphia public school teachers who were attacked and seriously injured by students in separate incidents. The two teachers talk about the rewards and perils of teaching in inner-city schools and discuss ways that school violence can be curbed. The two teachers are articulate in stating their love for teaching and students, particularly disadvantaged students, as well as describing the horrible attacks that left them bloody and battered....


On June 23, Title IX celebrated its 35th anniversary and columnists and bloggers have plenty to say about the landmark federal law that requires equal treatment for girls and boys on the playing field and at institutions that receive federal money. This Salon.com column points out the athletic limits once placed on girls which would now be unthinkable. In The Huffington Post attorney Emily J. Martin looks beyond athletics to the issue of single-sex education, also governed by the law. But the San Francisco Chronicle says the law is facing a mid-life crisis that includes a loss of leadership ...


If you're tech-savvy and always on the cutting edge of the latest technology advances for schools and districts, or if you know you need to learn more about everything from virtual schools to online professional development for teachers, take some time to check out Education Week's new publication Digital Directions. (Full disclosure here: I wrote several of the stories.) The publication is a great collection of information on the latest advancements in technology, and features stories about the ways math and science teachers are using high-tech gadgets and gizmos to reach out to students; methods for making online testing work ...


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