Each year many young foreign scholars come to the United States as exchange students in hopes of gaining a competitive edge. Most of them return home having had a positive experience. However, this July 5, 2006 NPR story reports that some nonprofit organization's are promising cultural-exchange experiences that often turn into academic nightmares for the student. The U.S. State Department has stepped in, but their is still little protection for these students. Posted by NPR....


In the pursuit of exciting, cutting-edge technology, schools may be over-estimating its benefits and overlooking the importance of integrating technology so that it is relevant to students and their studies. In this article from the American School Board Journal, Kathleen Vail explores the impact of technology on education. Despite its advantages, many of the teachers and administrators she interviewed voice their concern that the lure of gadgetry may be overshadowing the importance of learning....


Back in 2004, before Hurricane Katrina and the destruction of many of New Orleans' neighborhoods and schools, three local writing teachers started a new kind of "book club." Instead of reading books, club members (students in many of the area's struggling public schools) were paid to document their experiences and write autobiographical books about their communities. On the eve of Hurricane Katrina, the books published by the Neighborhood Story Project had already become local bestsellers. This feature from WhatKidsCanDo.org documents the project's success and recovery....


If you had Education Secretary Margaret Spellings' ear at dinner, what would you ask her? That is the question edutopia put to its readers. Read the published responses to see what they had to say....


Backed by a bipartisan group of distinguished education advocates, the Thomas B. Fordham Institute today released a new report it says provides a solution to equitably financing public education in the United States. Entitled "Fund the Child: A 100% Solution," the report is accompanied by a series of resources, including an op-ed from today's New York Times by former Secretary of Education Rod Paige....


National Public Radio correspondent Claudio Sanchez reports on recent data from Education Week that says states are reporting figures for graduating students that do not match up with the actual number of students receiving diplomas. The EdWeek report, Diplomas Count: An Essential Guide to Graduation Policy and Rates, is the first in a series of annual reports providing graduation data for all 50 states and the District of Columbia, and in the nation's 50 largest school districts. (NPR report requires audio player.)...


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