The U.S. Department of Education's television series, "Education News Parents Can Use," airs live each month during the school year. In the latest broadcast, "Special Education: Ensuring Excellence for All Students," (scroll down for link to archived webcast) members of the educational community discuss how the recently reauthorized IDEA legislation, combined with the No Child Left Behind Act, are together ensuring the academic progress of students with disabilities. (RealPlayer or Windows Media Player required)...


This audio news story from National Public Radio reports on the effectiveness of a universal mental health screening program for middle graders in Seattle. The only program of its kind in the U.S., the screening provides 6th graders with a "full emotional health check up," which supporters of the program claim can lead to early intervention in cases where serious mental health problems are detected. With severe depression affecting 20 percent of all young people by the time they reach age eighteen, according to the Surgeon General, should mental health screenings be more widley adopted in the nation's middle ...


Designed fifty years ago to give a select few high school students a head-start on college work, the Advanced Placement program is now administered to over a million students nationwide, and is viewed by many students (and parents) as an essential element in the college admissions process. Yet as numbers swell, many of those elite schools that pioneered the A.P. coursework are now looking for ways to free their students from a program some claim can "hijack the curriculum." From the New York Times' special section, Education Life....


Is there an arms race in higher education? The latest weekly podcast posted by The Merrow Report deals with the increasingly aggressive marketing by institutions of higher education in the competition for students, prestige, and status. Lara Couturier, an analyst working at the Futures Project at Brown University, gives her insight into the reasons why these institutions are devoting significant financial resources to marketing their "brand," and the impact this is having on the quality of education being offered. (Podcast requires free audio software.)...


Some critics argue that higher education in the United States lacks intellectual, and political, diversity. In this San Francisco Chronicle piece, researcher and professor David Davenport worries that, as classrooms become more politicized, "a liberal arts education has become politically liberal." This politically charged atmosphere, which some claim discriminates against students' rights to free speech, may also be creating friction in education programs for prospective teachers, as Robin Wright reports for the Chronicle of Higher Education (subscription required)....


In the recent Kitzmiller v. Dover Area School Board case, Judge John E. Jones wrote in an acerbically worded 139-page ruling that intelligent design should not be taught in science classrooms and, furthermore, that the concept is a religious idea, not a scientific one. In the wake of this decision, groups and individuals with many different perspectives have voiced their opinion on the issues involved in the case. The Thomas More Law Center, which represented the Dover School District in the case, called the ruling a troubling decision. Dr. John West, associate director of the Discovery Institute, the Seattle-based think ...


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