A federal judge has opted not to lift the suspension of a high school student in Washington state punished in connection with a most unflattering YouTube video about one of his teachers. The student, Gregory Requa, 18, denies involvement in producing the video, yet he has been suspended from Kentridge High School for 40 days, the Seattle Post-Intelligencer reports. Requa's lawyer argues that her client's free speech rights are being violated—regardless of whether he participated in making and posting the video. But U.S. District Judge Marsha Pechman agreed with the school district's argument that the punishment fit for ...


So, who are this year's "Daring Dozen"? According to the June issue of Edutopia, they're 12 people who "are reshaping the future of education." Edutopia now offers an online map that shows who the daring innovators are and where they operate. It's a cool tool and worth checking out....


She didn't exactly kill, but U.S. Secretary of Education Margaret Spellings handled herself well on The Daily Show With Jon Stewart last night. Well after the bedtime of most of the nation's students (hopefully), Spellings and Stewart chatted about No Child Left Behind, the "soft bigotry of low expectations," and Lunchables—which Stewart brought out along with No. 2 pencils and an apple just after Spellings sat down at the anchor/interview desk. Stewart told Spellings that she was the "only active member of our government—in terms of the executive branch—who is not allergic to me." "So ...


Over at PBS's teacher blog, learning.now blog host Andy Carvin wonders whether schools will be able to use the candidate videos on the Internet to inform students about the 2008 elections and to show them how to create video political commentary of their own. But to do this, schools would have to allow their students open access to political videos online. However, most of these videos are available via YouTube, a site which is blocked by many public schools. "These videos will be of clear educational benefit," Mr. Carvin writes, "yet as long as their host sites are blocked, ...


This week—May 17, to be specific—marked the 53rd anniversary of the landmark U.S. Supreme Court ruling in Brown v. Board of Education. An article in the May 18, 1954, edition of The New York Times recounts Chief Justice Earl Warren reading the decision in the courtroom: "In the field of public education," Warren said, "the doctrine of 'separate but equal' has no place. Separate educational facilities are inherently unequal." The NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund offers a personal look at one of the figures behind Brown and the changes he has witnessed since the ruling. ...


Education historian Diane Ravitch makes clear her opposition to New York City's plans to open a new public school devoted solely to study of Arabic culture and language in a guest column in the New York Daily News headlined "Arabic school fails the test—A United City Demands We Educate Kids Together." "This is a mistake," argues Ravitch, who also co-writes the Bridging Differences blog on edweek.org. "Such a school violates the very purpose of public education, which is to teach the ideas, traditions, values, knowledge and skills that young people need to become productive members of American society."...


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