November 2005 Archives

While the images of violence erupting in Paris' suburbs in early November may have shocked television viewers around the world, to many educators and policy experts familiar with the area it came as no great surprise. In this Voice of America article, Lisa Bryant highlights the link between the recent riots and France's education system. In this Toronto Star commentary, Daniel Jouanneau, France's Ambassador in Canada, points out recently formed government initiatives designed to tackle these social inequities blamed for the riots. Also, this audio report from Marketplace describes one possible solution already underway in France, government-funded Internats, or boarding ...


For many students, "getting out" of college can become even harder than "getting in," as many struggle with selecting a major and sticking to that course of study long enough to earn a degree. MSNBC's Gayle B. Ronan talks to college and career counselors at high schools and universities to find out how students and parents can avoid the often-costly and frustrating game of musical majors....


The debate over the teaching of science and religion in the classroom reached a fever pitch during the recent Kitzmiller v. Dover Area School District trial. In this Q & A from The New Yorker, Margaret Talbot provides some historical perspective on the case—and argues that the pending ruling on the teaching of intelligent design is only one more milestone in this ongoing American debate....


Rethinking Schools columnist Barbara Miner takes a critical look at the quality of the private schools in the Milwaukee school system, the nation's oldest voucher program. Citing results from an investigative report carried out by the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, Miner cautions it is "increasingly clear that a disturbing number of voucher schools are outright abominations." See also the Nov. 9 Education Week brief, "Milwaukee Nears Limit on Vouchers."...


Audio commentator Ankitha Bharadwaj of Youth Radio sounds off on the ubiquitous white device that, in the wrong hands, is proving to be an unwelcomed nuisance in her algebra II class. Should schools be welcoming iPods into the classroom?...


From National Public Radio, this audio report tells of the difficulties of students in Hancock County, Miss., as they adjust to the altered conditions of their school life following Hurricane Katrina. There's a growing bitterness in the community as recovery efforts drag on, and students are suffering the emotional aftermath....


Are state tests accurately gauging yearly progress in schools? In this Boston Globe article, David Denison describes some Massachusetts school officials' concern that yearly progress tests are not, in fact, reflective of progress over time. Instead, they worry students are judged not on how much they improve, but on whether or not they reach an often unrealistic achievement level. Despite all the fuss about too much testing, some educators believe that additional testing could lead to added value....


From the Nov. 28 issue of Newsweek, this article details the polarizing story-so-far as some states legislate on the teaching of "intelligent design" in their classrooms. Includes the related article, "Charles Darwin: Evolution of a Scientist." Also, join in the current online discussion on this topic on edweek.org, Science Standards: A Tale of Two Places....


Education outsourcing, in the form of tutoring and videoconferencing, has become increasingly popular in recent years. But how far will this phenomenon go? Are real, live teachers soon to be replaced by cyberinstructors — and in-class discussions by virtual classrooms? While the benefits of face-to-face interaction are hard to overlook, some argue that online tutoring is only the beginning of the educational outsourcing takeover....


The British government recently announced a scheme to give £500 to every secondary school in the nation to establish charity bank accounts. These accounts are to be managed exclusively by students, according to a recent article in the Times Online. The civic scheme is meant to encourage an ethos of social and personal responsibility amongst British youth, and to foster a lasting culture of giving. Could school leaders in the U.S. learn anything from this act in civics?...


Today's students may be able to use complex software and design flashy web sites. But do they know where to find their computer's USB port or when to perform a cold reboot — and how important is it that they do? In this feature from T.H.E. Journal, Sebastian Foti argues that, when it comes to technology and education, we have lost our way. How can educators and administrators better use technology to achieve educational goals, rather than viewing the technology as an end in itself?...


Are American school children being worked too hard? Amid concern about education standards in the United States, the authors of this recent Education Week commentary wonder if the pressure of achieving and performing well on standardized tests has American students both burnt-out and sapped of creative energy....


New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg likes charter schools. He likes them so much he intends to double the number of charter schools in the city, from 47 to 100, according to this recent article from the Gotham Gazette. But are charter schools the answer to New York City's education problems? Charter-advocates think they are....


It costs the U.S. government $6 billion per year to feed the 29 million students enrolled in the National School Lunch Program, and commercial food vendors are keen to get a slice of the pie, according to this NewsWeek article. In doing so, however, they have to negotiate strict federal restrictions on price and nutrition. And they have to make their choices "cool" enough for kids to eat. But are the kids getting what they need?...


The American Spectator founder R. Emmett Tyrrell points to the recently released NAEP scores in reading for middle schoolers to state that the time for a comprehensive embrace of school vouchers has arived. A comprehensive voucher program—not just limited to poor inner-city families—will establish a market in education, and this, writes Tyrrell, will be to everyone's gain. Especially educators....


How well do you know the No Child Left Behind Act? Standardized testing, "highly qualified" teachers, and "adequate yearly progress" might be familiar terms in an educator's lexicon these days. But what about the parental involvement mandate? This Edutopia article sheds more light on the lesser known requirements of the federal law....


Not too long ago, if a school needed to craft a new curriculum, it came through the administration or a curriculum specialist. These days, however, there are other key players involved: The parents. American School Board Journal Senior Editor Kathleen Vail writes on the increasly powerful role both parents and community members can have on curriculum issues in today's schools....


Advertisement

Recent Comments

  • shanae johnson: this need to get them selves to gether because our read more
  • Paul B.: Is this site up and running any more? read more
  • Charlene Younggren: I actually had a parent stalking the parking lot every read more
  • Katie Ward: I’m not sure I agree with Maria's comment that disengaged read more
  • Lindsey: This is very alarming to me considering that I teach read more

Archives

Categories

Technorati

Technorati search

» Blogs that link here