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MySpace or OurSpace?

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Increasingly, students are living their lives openly online. Schools have found ways to track what students are saying and doing online. And punishments have followed. All around the U.S. reprimands have been handed down from schools to students who made "inappropriate" postings on sites such as MySpace.com. This June 8 Salon.com article takes a look at the implications of this increased monitoring and the question of public students' right to freedom of expression.

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Students have no rights other than those allowed to them from their superiors. Rights, as we view them in today's society, are not those as outlined in our Constitution. Good choices reap good rewards; however, poor choices reap consequences.

Now hopefully those superiors are Christian pragmatists, with common sense and sound principles, and not Asian feminists, such as the one who apparently posted this suggestive, and biased propaganda.

Obviously speech that would not be protected if spoken in public or printed in a paper should not be protected on publicly viewable profiles on myspace. But schools shouldn't punish otherwise legal speech or attempt to intimidate students who express their feelings with the threat of suspension. That's outrageous and wrong. Maybe if students had more opportunities and channels to express their feelings about their schools in their schools they wouldn't have as much to vent on their myspace profiles. Maybe, also, schools would feel less defensive about expressions of frustration by students about their schools.

Suspending a student for making fun of the principal, or a teacher or any other adult within the authoritarian culture of a school is rather silly. Students tend to vent their frustrations with the rigors of school in such ways. Many adults do the same thing and many a boss or leader may find his or her face posted on a dart board or in a cartoon. The president of the United States is often depicted in newspapers as some kind of an idiot or other. One standout example was a cartoon that portrayed him as Alfred E. Newman, the Mad Magazine logo.
The question is really free speech however and be it on TV, in a newspaper, Magazine or on a webpage, evem children should be entitled to express themselves. Administartors and some teachers would be well-advised to get a sense of humor.

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