July 2006 Archives

This story from WIRED NEWS discusses how Google is trying to push and attract more aspiring programmers to the open-source world with its Google Summer of Code project. As part of the initiative, undergraduate students are paid to work on complex code projects over the summer while being mentored by some of the industry's leading programmers. Those selected for the summer of code project get a $4500 stipend for their efforts....


Can we protect children without banning social networking sites in schools? Adam Thierer thinks we can. In this article from IT&T News, he writes that the newly proposed Deleting Online Predators Act (DOPA), which would require federally funded schools to ban such web sites, is taking the wrong approach. According to Thierer, regulation—and not restriction—will be the key to online safety in schools....


The home life of students can have a tremendous impact on their ability—and the ability of their classmates—to learn. But how can educators turn a disruptive climate into an environment conducive to learning? In this article from Educational Leadership, a publication of the Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development, experienced educator Grace L. Sussman recounts her efforts at connecting with her 4th grade inner-city students and uncovering the reasons why they were struggling to achieve in the classroom....


Are America's schools being resegregated? In this article from Harvard's Ed.magazine, Hanna Bordas notes that many court decisions nationwide in the 1980s and 1990s resulted in school desegregation orders being removed. While this trend seems to undo much of the progress towards racial integration, some argue that it is a step in the right direction, away from any kind of racial discrimination. Bordas looks back on the history of desegregation in American schools, and offers some insight into the future....


According to a July 14 article from eSchool News, Congress--at the request of the president--is considering eliminating the single largest source of technology-specific funding for schools in the federal budget. This is in direct contrast to many other countries, the article states, which are pouring money into ed tech programs....


This special report on technology from Business Week contains an article on the place of educational learning in the child games market. The article deals specifically with the phenomenon of social networking and how some developers are tapping into this to provide safe learning environments for young students....


This National Public Radio audio feature reports on a language course with a difference. The Pentagon, specifically the Department of Defense, is footing the bill for language courses that are specifically developed to teach the native language of countries that are seen as a threat to the United States. The classes are being offered at Howard University in Washington D.C., and the reaction of students is, well, mixed....


According to figures in the recently released Wall Street Journal Online/Harris Interactive® Health-Care Poll, 84% of adults now think childhood obesity is a "major problem" in the U.S. Also, 83% of those surveyed thought that public schools should do more to limit student access to unhealthy food and snacks, and a large number also thought that children are becoming obese because adults are neglecting the eating habits of children. Highlights from the poll are posted by Harris Interactive. (Poll highlights require Adobe Acrobat Reader.)...


Can philanthropy transform America's education system? In this article from BusinessWeek, Jay Greene and William C. Symonds look at how the Bill & Melinda Gates foundation has both succeeded and failed in saving struggling U.S. schools. In a separate article, Jay Greene explores how the Gates Foundation will make good use of the Buffett megabillions....


Each year many young foreign scholars come to the United States as exchange students in hopes of gaining a competitive edge. Most of them return home having had a positive experience. However, this July 5, 2006 NPR story reports that some nonprofit organization's are promising cultural-exchange experiences that often turn into academic nightmares for the student. The U.S. State Department has stepped in, but their is still little protection for these students. Posted by NPR....


In the pursuit of exciting, cutting-edge technology, schools may be over-estimating its benefits and overlooking the importance of integrating technology so that it is relevant to students and their studies. In this article from the American School Board Journal, Kathleen Vail explores the impact of technology on education. Despite its advantages, many of the teachers and administrators she interviewed voice their concern that the lure of gadgetry may be overshadowing the importance of learning....


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