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March 11, 2014

There Is No Bubble in Educational Technology: Not For Businesses That Actually Make Sense

Many people are wondering whether there is a bubble in educational technology. Has too much venture capital been invested in the sector? Have valuations gotten too high? My answer is that there is a bubble in ideas that won't work and a dearth of capital for ideas that can work.

September 09, 2013

Students All Need Internet Access At Home As Well As At School, Don't They?

The E-Rate Program has played a critical role in moving our nation's schools into the 21st century, and I wish it had substantially more funding. I am concerned, though, that the recent Notice of Proposed Rulemaking outlines changes that will substantially reduce the effectiveness of this critical program.

July 16, 2013

The Problem with Ed-Tech Adoption: Infrastructure

If we are to properly outfit our classrooms with useful modern technology, we must first address the most critical stepping stone to adoption: infrastructure.

May 29, 2013

Closing the Gap: NYC's Ed-Tech Challenge

New York City's DOE seeks to be a leader in bringing innovation to the classroom. Through it's iZone schools, the DOE recently launched its Gap App Challenge as a way to introduce new technologies to its learning experience and develop concrete working relationships between developers and the schools they aim to help.

January 14, 2013

Get to Know a C.E.O., with Tiffany Cooper Gueye

Dr. Tiffany Cooper Gueye is the leader in charge of BELL (Building Educated Leaders for Life), a national non-profit organization that partners with schools and school districts to deliver high quality out-of-school time programs to underserved youth in grades K-8. Let's get to know her.

January 07, 2013

Symbiotic Brands: Borrowing the Prestige of Stanford

The brands of both Udacity and Coursera, like many academic brands, are composed out of affiliations with many other academic brands. What else do you think of when you think of these companies? Above all, you probably think of Stanford University. The founders of both companies were Stanford professors, and, in the usual story, the foundational event was when Sebastian Thrun taught an online artificial intelligence course at Stanford that attracted 160,000 students, of whom 23,000 finished the course. In this version of the story, the MOOCs leaped into the world out of the brow of Stanford University, much as the goddess Athena leaped fully formed and armored from the forehead of her father Zeus. Another god had to split Zeus's skull open with an axe to facilitate the birth, but so far the rise of the MOOCs has not been particularly traumatic for Stanford. The spawning of Udacity and Coursera has enhanced Stanford's reputation for both pedagogical and technological innovation.

December 29, 2012

Quality Access to Learning: Teachers and Technology

Wendy Heckert explores technology implementation in the classroom, and makes a plea to start-ups to help train teachers to best use new tools

December 26, 2012

CommaSpaceErgo: Crowdsourcing Education's Trends, Stats, and Facts

We, the education community, are in desperate need of a repository for statistics and trends of all sorts in the learning landscape. Why not build it together? CommaSpaceErgo is born...

December 18, 2012

Meekerpalooza 2012: How shifts in Internet usage will transform the education landscape

Let's take a look at the many ways that Internet trends in 2012 (as defined by the great Mary Meeker) may affect the K-12 landscape.

November 24, 2012

In Praise of Sardoodledom

Words are the weapons we use to combat the forces of communication. Ed-tech can be a weapon to combat the forces of learning styles.

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