If students in our schools aren't among the scores of people accessing social media and using it to become leaders, then we have some work to do.


As we head into summer, this is a great time to renew our commitment to finding a sense of equilibrium in this endless battle against the flow of digital information and stay present and productive in our personal and professional lives.


As we head into summer, I hope that educators everywhere will spend some time thinking about minor or major changes they can make in their schools and classrooms to encourage students to develop their ability to create new solutions to old problems.


We created an adapted K-12 design thinking cycle that's perfect for students of any age, level, and subject area.


Education technology and student data privacy can coexist in harmony, as long as educators, parents, policymakers, and students continue to share the discussion and work together.


Despite the fact that it did not make the headlines, a quick look below at some of the research from the Common Sense Media study shows that the problems surrounding the constructive use of technology are just as significant for parents as they are for students.


Be cautious about holding onto outdated traditions with white knuckles because we are comfortable with them. Encourage students to take a risk and try new things.


Instead of focusing on test scores, school rankings, and all of the other headlines that divide the stakeholders in school communities, communities need to get together and find out what we really believe is best for the future of our students.


It clear that there are a lot more questions than answers on the topic of OER. However, I am pretty sure that when we have to allocate funds to find freely accessible resources then they are not really free resources.


Despite the fact that our healthcare professionals are imploring schools to consider starting later in an effort to allow our students to be safer and more productive, the movement on this matter is still minimal.


The opinions expressed in Reinventing K-12 Learning are strictly those of the author(s) and do not reflect the opinions or endorsement of Editorial Projects in Education, or any of its publications.

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