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Top Five Reasons to Jump Into a Twitter Chat

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School leaders are always looking for quality professional learning opportunities for themselves and their teachers. For me, there is still nothing better than participating in an hour Twitter chat.  Dedicating some time to show staff where they can connect with colleagues from around the globe who have similar interests is well worth the time.  

Here are the top five reasons that school leaders should get themselves and their teachers involved in Twitter chats:

  1. Build your network - Educators will find colleagues from all over the globe who are in similar roles, whether it be classroom teachers or support personnel
  2. Solve problems - Educators will learn from others who have already found solutions to problems they are struggling with
  3. Receive affirmation - Educators will receive positive feedback from others who agree with their practices.
  4. Find experts - If there is a new initiative you want to try in your classroom or school then you will certainly find someone who has already tried it on Twitter.
  5. Keep up with current trends - Things are changing inside education at a faster pace than ever and there is no place better to stay on top of these changes.

 I had the chance to take part in a Twitter chat hosted by some colleagues in Massachusetts last week and the final question asked partcipants about their biggest takeaway. Check out a few of the responses below.  If you're looking for some great background information to share with your colleagues about how to do a Twitter chat and when different chats take place then check out Cybraryman's detailed page on the topic.


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