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The Mind Trust Just Might Be Looking for You

Last year, in Education Unbound, I addressed the critical role of smart approaches to identifying and nurturing problem-solvers. One of the initiatives I lauded was Indianapolis's terrific The Mind Trust, a nonprofit that does just this. I think that TMT is one of the neatest enterprises going today, and worth checking out. Though, more to the point, if you're an educator, reformer, or problem-solver and you've got the gumption and the know-how, The Mind Trust is now seeking you out.

The Mind Trust is now accepting applications for its Education Entrepreneur Fellowship, a unique opportunity designed to attract entrepreneurs and transformative ventures to Indianapolis and then support their efforts to tackle public ed's most vexing problems. During the two-year Fellowship, Fellows receive a full-time salary of $90,000 a year, benefits, a $20,000 start-up stipend, and the professional support necessary to turn a promising idea into a successful venture.

The Mind Trust is seeking applicants ready to approach stubborn challenges in fresh, promising ways and who are equipped with the skills needed to put their ideas into practice. The application is a rolling process; there is no deadline so, if you think you fit the bill, go ahead and hop in the mix.

Since launching the Education Entrepreneur Fellowship in 2007, over 1,000 applicants from 48 states and 28 countries have applied. So this is no small beer; this is the real deal. If you think you might have the chops, it's time to step up. In 2011, TMT expects to award up to two new Fellowships.

What impact have The Mind Trust's Fellows had to date? fF you're curious, take the advice of TMT's announcement, which urges:

"Read the Boston Globe's report of how Teach Plus, the initiative founded by The Mind Trust Fellow Celine Coggins, is training urban teachers to be leaders in reform and helping them develop and implement bold changes in teacher policy. Read TIME Magazine's cover story about how Summer Advantage USA, the initiative launched by Fellow Earl Martin Phalen, is helping tackle summer learning loss for disadvantaged students. Read about Fellow Abby Falik's initiative, Global Citizen Year, highlighted by New York Times columnist Nicholas Kristof in his call for more young Americans to 'Teach for the World.'"
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The opinions expressed in Rick Hess Straight Up are strictly those of the author(s) and do not reflect the opinions or endorsement of Editorial Projects in Education, or any of its publications.

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