Today, guest blogger Collin Hitt discusses how early college high schools—like western swing music—can be life changers for some.


This week, Collin Hitt starts off our slate of guest bloggers by spinning up a few of his favorite "sleeper" studies you probably haven't heard of yet.


So, I'm taking my summer break from blogging to catch up on a few projects, but while I'm away, you get the usual opportunity to visit with a lineup of terrific guest bloggers.


I had the chance to sit down last week with Adam Pisoni and Chris Walsh of Abl about the release of their new Master Scheduler, a dynamic school-scheduling platform intended to help schools and leaders rethink how they use and plan their time.


What tends to get lost in the ongoing debate over charter-school authorizing is the practical question: whether responsible authorizing can entail less bloat, bureaucracy, and paperwork.


The whole episode around the Department of Education's determination of Delaware's ESSA plan is a remarkable example of bureaucracy and paper-pushing run amok. It's also eerily familiar.


I can't help thinking that the center has come undone, in no small part, because mainstream, time-tested, once uncontroversial conservative sentiments have been labeled offensive by the same voices who wonder what happened to the responsible right.


Mitchell Chester, the longtime Massachusetts Commissioner of Education, a good man, and a true friend, passed away Monday evening. I'll always remember his passion for doing.


In school reform, I sometimes think we suffer from a curious malady: too much passion—and a shortage of disciplined professionalism.


I recently had a chance to chat with outgoing New Mexico State Superintendent Hanna Skandera about her experience, successes, challenges, mistakes, and lessons learned.


The opinions expressed in Rick Hess Straight Up are strictly those of the author(s) and do not reflect the opinions or endorsement of Editorial Projects in Education, or any of its publications.

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