This week, L. Trenton Marsh will be discussing the history of U.S. school choice with a particular emphasis on urban districts, and providing an ethnographic perspective on "no-excuses" charter schools.


This week, L. Trenton Marsh will be discussing the history of U.S. school choice with a particular emphasis on urban districts, and providing an ethnographic perspective on "no-excuses" charter schools.


This week, L. Trenton Marsh will be discussing the history of U.S. school choice with a particular emphasis on urban districts, and providing an ethnographic perspective on "no-excuses" charter schools.


The election has mercifully come to a close, the holiday season is soon to be upon us, the Trump folks are trying to manage a transition, and I need to do that final, careful copyedit of my upcoming book Letters to a Young Reformer. So, I'm going to take a break and turn the blog over to a stellar crew of guest bloggers.


Since it's Thanksgiving week, I figured it might be a nice chance to dwell a bit on the teachable moment we find ourselves in by re-running a few columns that kind of got brushed away at the time, but might register more fully now—and that might help encourage some to perhaps give a second thought to the underappreciated blessings of federalism, limited government, and executive restraint.


Since it's Thanksgiving week, I figured it might be a nice chance to dwell a bit on the teachable moment we find ourselves in by re-running a few columns that kind of got brushed away at the time, but might register more fully now—and that might help encourage some to perhaps give a second thought to the underappreciated blessings of federalism, limited government, and executive restraint.


Since it's Thanksgiving week, I figured it might be a nice chance to dwell a bit on the teachable moment we find ourselves in by re-running a few columns that kind of got brushed away at the time, but might register more fully now—and that might help encourage some to perhaps give a second thought to the underappreciated blessings of federalism, limited government, and executive restraint.


Since it's Thanksgiving week, I figured it might be a nice chance to dwell a bit on the teachable moment we find ourselves in by re-running a few columns that kind of got brushed away at the time, but might register more fully now—and that might help encourage some to perhaps give a second thought to the underappreciated blessings of federalism, limited government, and executive restraint.


This past week, I've been struck by how differently things appear to me than to the vast majority of folks in education.


A [non-exhaustive] list of some of the names I'd like to see considered for top jobs in Trump's Department of Education.


The opinions expressed in Rick Hess Straight Up are strictly those of the author(s) and do not reflect the opinions or endorsement of Editorial Projects in Education, or any of its publications.

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