The eagle-eyed Daniel Lautzenheiser reminded me that today marks exactly a year since I started RHSU. I've enjoyed it more than I might've expected, and hugely appreciate the various folks who have been kind enough to share tips, information, and thoughts. Anyway, RHSU readership is up pretty substantially since we started, and I thought some readers who've joined over time might be interested to learn a bit more about where I'm coming from. So, without further ado, here's the inaugural column that ran one year ago: Hi there. Or, in the phrasing of Christian Slater's homicidal but quirkily charming high ...


I think the Washington Post editorial page said it best. "The President punted. Having been given the chance, the cover and the push by the fiscal commission he created to take bold steps to raise revenue and curb entitlement spending, President Obama, in his fiscal 2012 budget proposal, chose instead to duck." To me, it seems that anyone serious about "investment," "winning the future," and doing right by our kids and grandkids has to be serious about getting the budget into rough balance over the next several years. Otherwise, unrestrained entitlement spending and a rapidly expanding public debt threaten to ...


Last week, I had the chance to talk with Sen. Rand Paul (R-KY), Tea Party favorite, about his views on education policy. Paul, a fierce critic of deficit spending and expansive government, has called for abolishing the federal Department of Education. His recent appointment to the U.S. Senate committee charged with education has boosted interest in his views on schooling. Here's what Sen. Paul had to say on ESEA/NCLB, Race to the Top, abolishing the Department of Ed, DC vouchers, the Common Core, for-profit higher ed, and related subjects. Rick Hess: Your appointment to HELP has generated a ...


Last summer, the Los Angeles Times created a furor with its hotly debated decision to post the value-added scores for thousands of Los Angeles teachers and to identify individual teachers, by name, as more or less effective. This week, the situation roared back to life when University of Colorado professor Derek Briggs, and coauthor Ben Domingue, issued a report titled "Due Diligence and the Evaluation of Teachers" which charged that the L.A. Times analysis was "based on unreliable and invalid research" and that the use of an alternative value-added model might have changed how half of 3,300 fifth-grade ...


Regular readers know that I'm no great fan of simple-minded value-added systems. As we've seen just this week with the L.A. Times value-added brouhaha (which I hope to address in the next couple days), it's easy for would-be reformers to overreach or oversell (see "Pyrrhic Victories?" for a more extended take). For the moment, though, let's set all that aside. Michelle Rhee has been zipping around the country touting value-added metrics and merit pay. While we're friends, I've some differences with Rhee's unbridled enthusiasm on this question, but none of that justifies the bizarre hatchet job on Rhee that ...


Last week, my colleague Olivia Meeks and I issued a new study examining the state of America's school boards. (For a terrific take, check out Christina Samuels' Ed Week story here). Partnering with the NSBA, the Iowa School Boards Association, and the Thomas B. Fordham Institute, we surveyed more than 900 school board members and 120 superintendents in over 500 school districts. The results update those in a study I authored back in 2002, also with the NSBA. Given that those results came at a time when NCLB was just being enacted, and now we're a decade into the "accountability ...


Well, the football season is over. I have nothing to add regarding the Packers' victory, the mediocre slate of commercials, or on the implications of the impending lockout. Before we turn the page, though, there's one lesson worth drawing with an eye to turnarounds. Last week, New England coach Bill Belichick won his third NFL coach of the year award. Owners desperately seeking to turn around their teams are wondering how they get their own version of Belichick or another successful coach. The most popular answer is to get a chip off the old block; NFL teams love to hire ...


Last year, in Education Unbound, I addressed the critical role of smart approaches to identifying and nurturing problem-solvers. One of the initiatives I lauded was Indianapolis's terrific The Mind Trust, a nonprofit that does just this. I think that TMT is one of the neatest enterprises going today, and worth checking out. Though, more to the point, if you're an educator, reformer, or problem-solver and you've got the gumption and the know-how, The Mind Trust is now seeking you out. The Mind Trust is now accepting applications for its Education Entrepreneur Fellowship, a unique opportunity designed to attract entrepreneurs and ...


New York City Chancellor Joel Klein announced late last year that he'd be stepping down from his post and taking up a newly created position as CEO of the Education Division at News Corp. On Tuesday, I had the chance to chat with Joel about his tenure, his takeaways, and changes in the reform landscape during the past decade. Rick Hess: As you look back on your years as Chancellor, what comes to mind when you think of your most successful efforts? Joel Klein: I'm not a guy who likes to spend a lot of time looking backward, but there ...


New York City Chancellor Joel Klein announced late last year that he'd be stepping down from his post and taking up a newly created position as CEO of the Education Division at News Corp. Yesterday, I had the chance to chat with Joel about his new job and the promise of educational innovation. Rick Hess: Joel, what can you tell us about the new job? Joel Klein: I'll be the CEO of the Education Division at News Corp. It's a just-launched division in which we'll be looking at a variety of possible acquisitions and opportunities. I've only been in place ...


The opinions expressed in Rick Hess Straight Up are strictly those of the author(s) and do not reflect the opinions or endorsement of Editorial Projects in Education, or any of its publications.

Follow This Blog

Advertisement

Most Viewed on Education Week

Categories

Archives

Recent Comments