Yesterday, I discussed our earnest Secretary of Education's unfortunate proclivity for quick fixes that promise to worsen the budgetary hole districts are in. But that's not all. In the same briefing where he made it clear that he's not a big believer in planning ahead, Duncan also made the fantastical claim, to USA Today's Greg Toppo, that, "The vast majority of districts around the country have literally been cutting for five, six, seven years in a row. And, many of them, you know, are through, you know, fat, through flesh, and into bone." Duncan added, "We want people to be ...


I'm a simple guy. I admit it. Maybe that's why I'm so fond of the first rule of holes. You know: "When you're in one, stop digging." But that's not the way our earnest Secretary of Education likes to do things. Scott Pattison, the executive director of the National Association of State Budget Officers, says, "There are so many issues that go way beyond the current downturn...This is an awful time for states fiscally, but they're even more worried about 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014." Lydia Ramos, spokeswoman for L.A. Unified, says, "You've got this herculean task to deal ...


It's been six months since I first stuck a toe into the blogosphere. At a minimum, that got pals like Alexander Russo, Andy Rotherham, Sara Mead, Kevin Carey, and Mike Petrilli to stop ridiculing me for being behind the times (though they're now telling me my posts are too long, too removed from the blog v. blog fray, and insufficiently linky. Sometimes, you just can't win...). Anyway, as I told former Ed Week honcho Caroline Hendrie when she suggested that I try my hand at blogging, I wasn't sure how it would turn out. I had a notion of wanting ...


On Sunday, the L.A. Times ran its controversial analysis of teacher value-added scores in L.A. Unified School District (LAUSD). The paper used seven years of reading and math scores to calculate performance for individual teachers who've taught grades three through five, and plans to publish the effectiveness ratings with the teacher's names. The actual analysis was handled for the paper by RAND analyst Richard Buddin. If you want to get quickly up to speed on this, check out Joanne Jacobs' stellar summary here and Stephen Sawchuck's take here. The story has triggered an avalanche of comment, including cheers ...


I thought I'd been pretty clear about my view of the Edujobs bill, but a flurry of interviews last week made it plain that reporters had trouble believing that I really thought the $10 billion Edujobs bill was flat-out bad for K-12 schooling. So, I want to be crystal clear. I think that Edujobs was not just wasteful but was positively harmful. And, yes, I think this even though ED promised to streamline its normal processes so that states will "receive funding as quickly as possible" and whipped up some calculations touting the number of jobs it's claiming to save ...


I was struck recently by the degree to which we're having two distinct, contrary conversations about technology and schooling. I was up in Boston last week for a three-day symposium on "Personalized Learning" (hosted by the Software & Information Industry Association, ASCD, and CCSSO) and felt like I was witness to two completely unrelated visions of education technology. The romanticist camp traces its roots to Rousseau's Emile and its radical "progressive" vision of the unchained learner. This stance, voiced by so many educational administrators and pedagogues talking of the "tyranny of testing," celebrates the need to let "imagination blossom" and recoils ...


For the past year, our earnest Secretary of Education has been banging the drum for mayoral control. As I've noted many times, I'm very sympathetic to the argument that mayoral control, done smart, can be a useful step in turning around troubled school systems. But I've been concerned about the tendency to romanticize its promise and to overlook its potential problems--especially the likelihood that mayoral control will limit access to independent metrics and performance data. Over at Flypaper, my good pal Mike Petrilli voiced some second thoughts about mayoral control earlier this week after reading a WaPo column from a ...


In a new Teachers College Record commentary, Penn State professors Kathleen M. Collins and Joseph Valente make an impressive contribution to the ranks of incomprehensible edu-babble. The abstract of "[Dis]ableing the Race to the Top" is all you really need (or may want) to read. It begins, "The authors present the notion of [dis]ableing as way of making visible the presence and limiting effects of ability-normative thinking." It concludes, "In this commentary they briefly introduce [dis]ableing and demonstrate its usefulness in uncovering the influences of ability-normative thinking through a snapshot analysis of discourses pertaining to the Race ...


A few weeks ago I suggested that ed reformers should take care not to rely too heavily on the filmmakers of the new wave of edu-agitprop flicks. For one thing, it'd be a shame if lots of time, money, and energy were spent building them up and featuring them as spokespeople--only for them to do what documentarians do, which is move on to a new project in a new area of interest. So, I was amused last week when the news broke that new school reform icon Davis Guggenheim, director of Waiting for Superman, was in negotiations to direct Paramount's ...


In its inimitable style, the New York Times yesterday featured a page one ed story celebrating an aimless new district policy and the superintendent responsible. In a story headlined "Little as They Try, Students Can't Get a D Here," NYT's Winnie Hu enthusiastically hailed the new "no D's" policy adopted by New Jersey's Mount Olive school district. The notion is that, well, the district will no longer issue D's. "D's are simply not useful in society," explained superintendent Larrie Reynbolds. While Mount Olive students could previously pass a class with a 65, and earn a D, they will now pass ...


The opinions expressed in Rick Hess Straight Up are strictly those of the author(s) and do not reflect the opinions or endorsement of Editorial Projects in Education, or any of its publications.

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