The importance of the distinction between RIF notices, layoffs, and job losses is also one of the startling findings from our study: most classroom teachers who received a RIF notice were not actually laid off during the Great Recession and did not actually lose their jobs.


The entrenched lore that we lose half of our teachers after five years is repeated as fact again and again. Surely our level of concern about the "looming teacher shortage" ought to cool down.


The U.S. Supreme Court's decision in the Rebecca Friedrichs v. California Teachers Association (CTA) case could send shock-waves through the teaching profession and empower teachers to make educated decisions about union membership.


The outdated union model is harming students and alienating a rapidly changing workforce. Fortunately, more and more classroom teachers are embracing policies that put students and professionalism first.


It's high time that true professionalism is embraced as an essential part of the education reform movement, and AAE is the change we need.


"YES, I am a teacher in a charter school!" These words can be controversial in some circles, but here's why I've chosen this path.


I'm going to take a blog break in August, but while I'm away, I'll be leaving you in some exceptionally capable hands.


Today, the College Board released its newly revised AP U.S. History framework, which has some intriguing parallels to the Common Core kerfuffle.


As I've traveled, talked about The Cage-Busting Teacher, and heard reactions, I've found several things particularly striking.


Five years on, we can draw at least seven lessons from Race to the Top.


The opinions expressed in Rick Hess Straight Up are strictly those of the author(s) and do not reflect the opinions or endorsement of Editorial Projects in Education, or any of its publications.

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