The outdated union model is harming students and alienating a rapidly changing workforce. Fortunately, more and more classroom teachers are embracing policies that put students and professionalism first.


It's high time that true professionalism is embraced as an essential part of the education reform movement, and AAE is the change we need.


"YES, I am a teacher in a charter school!" These words can be controversial in some circles, but here's why I've chosen this path.


I'm going to take a blog break in August, but while I'm away, I'll be leaving you in some exceptionally capable hands.


Today, the College Board released its newly revised AP U.S. History framework, which has some intriguing parallels to the Common Core kerfuffle.


As I've traveled, talked about The Cage-Busting Teacher, and heard reactions, I've found several things particularly striking.


Five years on, we can draw at least seven lessons from Race to the Top.


I couldn't disagree more with the argument for a "national education plan." There's a time and place for national plans, but education is not it.


Yesterday, the House passed the Student Success Act, but there's still a ways to go before a final bill. Here's a checklist for a final bill to "fix" NCLB.


By August, the House and Senate could each pass an ESEA reauthorization bill. But lately they've struggled with not only the inevitable disagreements, but also unnecessary distractions.


The opinions expressed in Rick Hess Straight Up are strictly those of the author(s) and do not reflect the opinions or endorsement of Editorial Projects in Education, or any of its publications.

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