There's much to say on testing and accountability in 2017. But today I'll stick to offering just five thoughts sparked by Dan Koretz's new book and yesterday's discussion.


More than a quarter of teachers miss more than two weeks each year, above and beyond scheduled breaks and holidays. That's a problem. And the fact that union leaders can't say so is perhaps a bigger one.


If we're going to refashion a 19th-century model of schooling for the 21st century (and I think we need to), how we go about it will be at least as important as what we try to do.


Today, I chat with Joel Rose, the CEO of Teach to One, discussing what it is, how it works, how horse-and-buggy assessment can stymie this kind of instruction, and where the venture is going.


The hyperbole that greeted the nothingburger of Trump's budget swamped the chance to discuss whether some federal education spending should be cut.


The impact of even a seemingly positive reform can be negative if the costs are high enough.


Today, I chat with Eric Kalenze, the US organizer of researchED, talking about the project's history, his involvement, and their upcoming conference.


As students across the country head back to school, I can't help but imagine what words of wisdom President Trump would have for the nation's classrooms.


Guest blogger Maddie Fennell wraps up her week discussing how and why teachers should lead through advocacy.


Today, guest blogger Maddie Fennell argues that rather than lowering the bar, we should make teaching into a true profession with both accountability and autonomy.


The opinions expressed in Rick Hess Straight Up are strictly those of the author(s) and do not reflect the opinions or endorsement of Editorial Projects in Education, or any of its publications.

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