Exercising a "beginner's mind" is the simplest way to cut through bureaucracy to determine whether something makes sense and in fact truly benefits students and teachers -- Becca Bracy Knight


Regardless of who's at the helm, a cabinet of rivals will have a greater chance of coming up with new ideas and solutions that help students learn and teachers thrive -- Becca Bracy Knight


So, it's been three years since I started writing RHSU. Other than some of the bizarrely ad hominem commentary, it's been terrific. But it's also a bit wearying, and I'm in need of a bit of a break (especially as I do the requisite road show and writing around Cage-Busting Leadership). So, here's the deal. Today, as we do at this time every year, we'll re-run the inaugural RHSU post (and mission statement) for those new to RHSU since last year. Starting Monday, I'm going to be on sabbatical through the end of April--then I'll be back, tanned, rested, ready, ...


It's not either-or: you're not a "cage-buster" or a believer in PD. Rather, PD can be an exercise with very little reward until you're using it as a problem-solving tool.


I've little to say on the President's SOTU last night, or on Sen. Rubio's response.more interesting to me is that yesterday was the official launch date for my new book, Cage-Busting Leadership


Jazon Zimba is the founding principal of Student Achievement Partners and lead writer of the Common Core mathematics standards. I appreciated having a chance to sit down and chat with him about the whole ordeal.


We believe in the promise of data--but as a tool, not as a talisman. We offer various suggestions on this count.


Well, a particular challenge for "cage-busting" is the four self-imposed traps that ensnare many leaders.


There are two strategies when it comes to using resources more effectively and "stretching the school dollar": optimizing and rethinking.


Every time I set out to talk about Cage-Busting Leadership, I inevitably encounter four of the verbal tics that can make edu-discussions so tedious and frustrating.


The opinions expressed in Rick Hess Straight Up are strictly those of the author(s) and do not reflect the opinions or endorsement of Editorial Projects in Education, or any of its publications.

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