Hidy all, I'm back. Want to thank Heather, Bill, and Sarah for some terrific posts. We're about to head into heavy pre-election mode, but there was one particular development while I was gone that I feel compelled to address. I've been skeptical but sympathetic on the parent trigger. But the parent trigger crowd pretty much lost me when Parent Revolution's National Communications Director David Phelps sent out a craven e-mail blast that needlessly attacked for-profit charter providers in a cheap effort to score political points. Phelps wrote, "Those who oppose Parent Trigger laws [argue] that passing and implementing a Parent ...


Note: Sarah Reckhow, assistant professor of political science at Michigan State University, is guest posting this week. In my book, Follow the Money, I compare the top-down approach to education reform in New York City to the slower and more open approach of Los Angeles. Today I will show that Los Angeles--a place that rarely gets highlighted by Boardroom Progressives--has some lessons for would-be-reformers. Although Mayor Villaraigosa attempted to gain mayoral control in 2006, Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD) is still governed by an elected board. This makes LAUSD less attractive for funders who favor districts with mayoral or ...


Note: Sarah Reckhow, assistant professor of political science at Michigan State University, is guest posting this week. Some large urban school districts receive millions of dollars in foundation grants, while others get none. In my book, Follow the Money, I show that the districts receiving the most funding had mayoral or state control, instead of an elected school board. In 2005, New York City, Los Angeles, Chicago, Oakland, and Boston got the most grant dollars (all districts with mayoral or state control at the time, except for LA). More recently, districts like Washington, DC and New Orleans have come under ...


Note: Sarah Reckhow, assistant professor of political science at Michigan State University, is guest posting this week. Not too long ago, education philanthropists were facing persistent criticism for their ineffectiveness. Much of this criticism was tied to the $500 million Annenberg Challenge, which provided grants to 18 project sites to support locally developed education reforms. In his book, The Foundation, Joel Fleishman calls the Annenberg Challenge "one of the major failures in foundation history." This statement oversimplifies the Challenge's record--each project site has a different story--but reform initiatives faded away in many Annenberg sites. The criticism continued even as the ...


Note: Sarah Reckhow, assistant professor of political science at Michigan State University, is guest posting this week. Thank you to Rick, for the opportunity to guest blog. An education reform "movement" is underway. There is a common understanding of the who (Michelle Rhee, Joel Klein, Wendy Kopp, Bill Gates, Eli Broad, Geoffrey Canada, Reed Hastings, Jon Schnur, Steve Barr, Joanne Weiss, Jim Shelton) and what (charter schools, merit pay, Common Core, school choice, alternative certification, mayoral control) of this movement. But how have these individuals and ideas come together? Private wealth has been an essential resource for supporting many of ...


Note: Bill Jackson, founder and CEO of GreatSchools, is guest posting this week. Follow Bill and GreatSchools on Twitter at @Bill_Jackson and @GreatSchools. As promised, let's talk about building community demand and support for high-quality education. That's key if we're going to build great schools and achieve excellent educational outcomes in our communities. Of course, people have different ideas about what "high-quality" education means. Take parents themselves. In my Tuesday post, I shared my own aspirations for my daughters' education. Other parents have different aspirations. How are we going to build community demand for excellence if we have lots ...


Note: Bill Jackson, founder and CEO of GreatSchools, is guest posting this week. Follow Bill and GreatSchools on Twitter at @Bill_Jackson and @GreatSchools. Yesterday, I came down firmly on the side of investing parents and local communities with lots of responsibility and authority for their children's education. But the challenge of this approach is clear: What if parents are too broke, busy, or stressed to pay close attention to their children's education? What if they didn't get a strong education themselves and lack the knowledge and skills that would enable them to be effectively involved? What if local school ...


Note: Bill Jackson, founder and CEO of GreatSchools, is guest posting this week. Follow Bill and GreatSchools on Twitter at @Bill_Jackson and @GreatSchools. I'd like to shift gears a bit today and talk about accountability. If you read my Tuesday post, you know that I have certain ambitions for my daughters. Many of my goals depend on actions I take as well as actions that teachers and schools take. Reviewing my list of 16, I see at least 11 that are going to require a lot from me: • Be passionate about some activities or commitments • Love to read; read ...


Note: Bill Jackson, founder and CEO of GreatSchools, is guest posting this week. Follow Bill and GreatSchools on Twitter at @Bill_Jackson and @GreatSchools. My dream school information system would provide insight into whether a particular school would help my daughters realize my aspirations for them (see Tuesday's post) and as well as shed light on many of the aspects of schools I look for on a tour (see Wednesday's post). This month, GreatSchools is launching some elements of this vision with pilots in Indianapolis, Milwaukee and Washington, DC. But I'm going to challenge myself to think beyond our current ...


Note: Bill Jackson, founder and CEO of GreatSchools, is guest posting this week. Tomorrow, we'll talk about my dream school information system - what I'd really like to see out there to power informed school choice. Before we do that, though, I'd like to share how I would go about assessing the quality of an elementary school if I was choosing one for my daughters today. This is all in the spirit of keepin' it real. I'd love to hear your ideas. As the CEO of GreatSchools, I have to start with the data, of course. At GreatSchools.org, I ...


The opinions expressed in Rick Hess Straight Up are strictly those of the author(s) and do not reflect the opinions or endorsement of Editorial Projects in Education, or any of its publications.

Follow This Blog

Advertisement

Most Viewed on Education Week

Categories

Archives

Recent Comments