Note: Trenton Goble, Chief Academic Officer of MasteryConnect, is guest posting this week. I want to thank Rick for allowing me this forum to share my thoughts on assessment and offer a special thank you to everyone who took the time to share their thoughts. How can we help teachers find real value in the formative assessment process? Can we clearly and efficiently track each child's individual performance relative to the essential concepts he or she must know, and work to ensure mastery for all students? These are the questions we set out to answer when my team and I ...


Note: Trenton Goble, Chief Academic Officer of MasteryConnect, is guest posting this week. Today I am going to take a deeper dive into the world of educational testing. I will hopefully make sense of it all in Friday's post where I will explain the importance of teaching students how to build a garden shed. While I was a student, from kindergarten to graduate school, I took tests. Lots of tests! More often than not, I did very well on those tests. I was a good test taker and consequently, I was considered smart and a good student in the eyes ...


Note: Trenton Goble, Chief Academic Officer of MasteryConnect, is guest posting this week. I want to thank Rick for giving me the opportunity to guest blog this week, and hope you will join in on the conversation. Over the last 20 years, I have worked as an elementary school teacher, principal, and district director. In recent years, I have become very interested in how we, as educators, assess and monitor individual student performance. Three years ago, I helped cofound MasteryConnect, an online solution geared towards helping teachers monitor student mastery of essential skills and concepts. My posts this week will ...


Note: Daniel Lautzenheiser, program manager in education policy studies at the American Enterprise Institute, is guest posting this week. This week I've looked at two of the most popular K-12 issues--teacher quality and school accountability. My plan was to conclude today with a third--what lessons, if any, can public education learn from other sectors. I'll touch on that very briefly, but wanted to take the roundabout way in light of a slew of comments on yesterday's laudatory post on the importance of shutting down bad schools and allowing good ones to expand. In response, a number of commenters (both on ...


Note: Daniel Lautzenheiser, program manager in education policy studies at the American Enterprise Institute, is guest posting this week. If there's ever a tangible physical reminder about the differences in education quality in a particular locale, it is found on the floors of a school building on West 134th Street in Harlem. Literally on the floors. There, a line of tape runs down the hallways. On one side is Democracy Prep Charter School, which in 2010 was the best middle school in New York City. On the other side, until recently, was the Academy of Collaborative Education (ACE), which that ...


Note: Daniel Lautzenheiser, program manager in education policy studies at the American Enterprise Institute, is guest posting this week. A few lingering thoughts from yesterday's post that didn't fit cleanly into the original narrative. First, by way of clarification, the "loose on entrance and tight on results" standard was meant to refer to flexibility around credentialing and recruitment (and, by extension, issues such as pay and tenure) of new teachers, not the quality of those teachers. It was not a call to open the floodgates to a raft of inexperienced beginners, lower admissions standards to education schools, deprofessionalize the job, ...


Note: Daniel Lautzenheiser, program manager in education policy studies at the American Enterprise Institute, is guest posting this week. Thanks to Rick for letting me fill in for him for a second go-round. Last time, I talked about a few of the lessons I've learned in a couple years studying education policy here at AEI. This week, we'll look at what I see as three of the most pressing K-12 issues: what we know about teacher quality, what happens when accountability works, and the business side of school reform. How's that for an easy week? By the end, no doubt, ...


Hey folks. So I'm heading off for a few weeks. I'll be teaching at UPenn and Rice, visiting with UVA's School Turnaround Specialist Program and Clark County's reformers, and generally getting out and about. I'll have a chance to read and talk to a bunch of interesting people. Hell, with any luck, I'll even learn a few things. Anyway, seemed like a good time to hand the RHSU wheel over to some stellar guest bloggers, and to see what they have to say. First up, the week of July 9, we have AEI's own Daniel Lautzenheiser. Daniel, the newly-appointed program ...


After tomorrow, I'll be taking a four-week summer blogging break--I'll introduce your impressive line-up of guest stars tomorrow. Meanwhile, things have backed up while I finished the Cage-Busting Leadership manuscript (which went off to Harvard Ed Press on Tuesday). So, today, I want to hit on a couple stories that I've really been meaning to touch upon. Charter Abuse at U.S. Department of Ed: First up, people sometimes ask why I'm a little nervous about the Gates-sponsored urban "charter compacts," pledges by charters to ensure their students are demographically representative of the community, or state efforts to apply teacher ...


Nina Rees has just been named the new president of the National Alliance for Public Charter Schools, the national organization of the country's charter schools. As of August 20, she'll take the reins from interim president Ursula Wright, who has impressively filled the job for nearly a year. Nina served in the Bush administration as the first Assistant Secretary for Innovation and Improvement (the job currently held by Jim Shelton), and has worked for the last several years as a senior vice president at Knowledge Universe. Given Nina's new role, and the current tumult around charter schooling, I thought it ...


The opinions expressed in Rick Hess Straight Up are strictly those of the author(s) and do not reflect the opinions or endorsement of Editorial Projects in Education, or any of its publications.

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