Note: Chapman Snowden is the founder of Kinobi and an innovator in training at 4.0 Schools. First let's welcome Stew Stout from Kickboard back to the table--he's helped me with this post. Ed tech entrepreneurs need to work with teachers and school leaders to understand their needs. This is what should happen. The bigger question is how ed tech entrepreneurs work with teachers and school leaders, because it certainly is not easy. We can hopefully all agree (yes, that means you too, policy wonks) that the process of getting fully functional tools into the hands of teachers is beyond ...


Note: Chapman Snowden is the founder of Kinobi and an innovator in training at 4.0 Schools. There's no better way to title a post about ed tech than a quote from one of the most underrated hip hop groups of all time, Mobb Deep. I promise it's relevant. Last week a friend forwarded me a fantastic article commenting on the use of technology in education. As I read it, I found myself quickly developing "aggressive head-nodding syndrome." In particular, this section, referencing a report from the Ford Foundation, struck me: ... [there are] gaps between what Federal and state funds ...


Note: Chapman Snowden is the founder of Kinobi and an innovator in training at 4.0 Schools. First of all, thanks to Rick for letting me blog in his absence. I'd also like to thank his readers for allowing me to hopefully entertain and inspire them with my musings over the next five days. Finally, I'd like to thank Stew Stout, the Marketing and Outreach Manager at Kickboard. Stew and I have worked together on this post, so when I say "we" know that I'm not just referring to an imaginary friend. A tip of the cap is due to ...


Note: Jonathan Plucker, a professor at Indiana University and the director of the Center for Evaluation and Education Policy, is guest-posting this week. I appreciate having the opportunity to pinch-hit for Rick this week, and thank you to everyone who sent comments and feedback during the week. As we head into the weekend, I thought we'd take a lighter approach and look more closely at a recent book on urban education. If you're anything like me, you have no shortage of books piling up on your desk about America's urban school problems. They seem to cluster into two broad categories: ...


Note: Jonathan Plucker, a professor at Indiana University and the director of the Center for Evaluation and Education Policy, is guest-posting this week. I was recently interviewed for a story on ability grouping in Ohio by a reporter, Charlie Boss. We got into an involved discussion on the difference between tracking and grouping. I recycled a line from a recent talk: "The distinction is pretty easy. Tracking is evil. Grouping is good." And I do see it as being that straightforward. Tracking is the systematic grouping of children by some demographic variable (economic status, gender, but more often than not, ...


Note: Jonathan Plucker, a professor at Indiana University and the director of the Center for Evaluation and Education Policy, is guest-posting this week. When historians discuss early 21st century American education, I'm convinced they will pinpoint our decision to focus almost exclusively on minimum competency as an educational and economic turning point. And by "turning point," I mean that they will ask, "What on earth were they thinking?" Let me be clear: I'm not saying that getting every third grader to at least a third grade reading level is unimportant. To the contrary, getting 100% of our students to minimal ...


Note: Jonathan Plucker, a professor at Indiana University and the director of the Center for Evaluation and Education Policy, is guest-posting this week. As a policy researcher who moonlights as a psychologist, my perspective is often quite different from other education policy researchers and analysts. This policy/psychology perspective is admittedly unique, but it does give me a different angle on policy from time to time. This was starkly apparent as I monitored reactions to the NCLB/ESEA waiver process. The process has been the subject of much eye-rolling and consternation, but I worry that people have been too quick ...


Note: Jonathan Plucker, a professor at Indiana University and the director of the Center for Evaluation and Education Policy, is guest-posting this week. Everyone has "uh-oh" moments: A flash of insight accompanied by a sense of impending doom. I had one of those moments recently, but I'm getting ahead of myself. Let's start by noting that I am not an international alarmist. As the title of this post implies, Americans love to have a bogey-man, we just don't do well in uni-polar worlds. I've tried to explain to undergraduates what it was like to grow up during the Cold War, ...


Hi folks. So I'm about to take one of my blog breaks as I start to approach crunch time on my upcoming book on cage-busting leadership. (For a quick intro to what the book holds, see my blog post on it here.) Fortunately, I'm once again psyched to offer up a stellar array of contributors to step in for the next four weeks. First up, next week, is Jonathan Plucker. Jonathan is a professor of educational psychology and cognitive science at Indiana University as well as the director of IU's massive Center for Evaluation and Education Policy. He's an expert ...


[Note: I coauthored this post with Francesca Pickett. Pickett is the nom de plume of a U.S. Department of Education employee who, for obvious reasons, wishes to remain anonymous.] A little over a year ago, U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan responded to the explosive news that even first-timer Shanghai outpaced the U.S. on international assessments by terming the news a "wake-up call" and a "Sputnik moment." Sixteen short months after that impassioned charge, the nation's education researchers will soon trek to their annual confab to share the analyses and findings that can help address this daunting ...


The opinions expressed in Rick Hess Straight Up are strictly those of the author(s) and do not reflect the opinions or endorsement of Editorial Projects in Education, or any of its publications.

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