Note: Patricia Dickenson, a former elementary school teacher in Los Angeles, is guest posting this week. Dr. Dickenson is a member of ASCD's Emerging Leaders Program. It seems as of late, blogs and news clippings in reference to education focus upon how our students perform juxtaposed to our international peers. Such a concentration on performance will only serve to fuel the influx of new tests, a standardized approach to teaching, and heighten the push toward a value-added approach for teacher evaluation. In my final post I would like to shift gears from a quantitative approach to a qualitative one. I ...


Note: Patricia Dickenson, a former elementary school teacher in Los Angeles, is guest posting this week. Dr. Dickenson is a member of ASCD's Emerging Leaders Program. In my first post, I addressed educational drawbacks that English language learners may encounter in schools. In today's post I would like to address how schools and districts can be more resourceful in closing the achievement gap. Experts believe the way schools support, assess, and track could be pivotal in meeting the needs of this diverse group of students. Spend Money on Books, not Tests According to Jim Cummins, an expert on bilingual education, ...


Note: Patricia Dickenson, a former elementary school teacher in Los Angeles, is guest posting this week. Dr. Dickenson is a member of ASCD's Emerging Leaders Program. This past Monday we celebrated the achievements of Dr. Martin Luther King. His work has changed the ideologies, laws, and social structure of America. Dr. King's courage as a relentless leader and his exceptional power of speech has inspired many to challenge the status quo and peacefully work toward dismantling social inequalities. In the spirit of Dr. King, I would like to use this platform to discuss inequities in education. I want to thank ...


Note: Daniel Lautzenheiser, a research assistant in education policy studies at the American Enterprise Institute, is guest posting this week. This week, I've looked at two insights that have profoundly shaped the way I view today's education debates, and are helpful for reformers and policymakers heading into 2012: first, that education reform is a mindset, not a set of particular policies, and second, that one "size" or model of schooling does not fit all situations. These ideas paint a picture of a robust education system where creative and talented reformers can solve problems facing our schools. At the same time, ...


Note: Daniel Lautzenheiser, a research assistant in education policy studies at the American Enterprise Institute, is guest posting this week. When I stumbled on an article in The Atlantic a week or so ago entitled "What Americans Keep Ignoring About Finland's School Success," I anticipated--based on the catchy title and the fact that the link was tweeted by a colleague known for her good sense--that it would offer a fresh take on what is rapidly becoming one of education's most tired debates. Perhaps the article was going to argue that "what Americans keep ignoring" is Finland's wildly different size and ...


Note: Daniel Lautzenheiser, a research assistant in education policy studies at the American Enterprise Institute, is guest posting this week. Many thanks to Rick for giving me a chance to blog. Since every guest blogger here has offered some unique perspective to the blog--as a teacher, say, or a budding education entrepreneur--I hoped to do the same. And the opportunity was massive: I could, for the first time, give the RHSU faithful insight into what life is really like working every day for Rick Hess. Top 10 quotes? Best memories on a business trip? "That time in Houston when..."? The ...


Hi all. So I'm about to take a break from the blog, to duck some of the post-Edu-Scholar rankings excitement and to focus on my upcoming book on cage-busting leadership. Fortunately, I think we've once again lucked into a stellar line-up of fresh guest blogging talent to step up for the next three weeks. First up, this week, is Daniel Lautzenheiser. Regular RHSU readers will recognize the name. Daniel is the preternaturally talented AEI research assistant who has been the man behind RHSU since day one, while juggling a slew of other edu-projects. He's always sharp and ever calm, while ...


If we compare this year's Edu-Scholar top 25 to 2011's, there are a lot of familiar faces--and some interesting movement. New to the top ten this year, from 2011, are Terry Moe, Richard Arum, and David Cohen. Moe rocketed up the chart, from 34th to sixth, with a big assist from his influential new treatise Special Interest. David Cohen's jump was similarly impressive, as he shot from 35th to tenth. New to the top 20 from last year are Dan Koretz, Bob Pianta, and Camilla Benbow. And new to the top 25 from last year were Andy Porter and Jay ...


Today, RHSU unveils the 2012 Edu-Scholar Public Presence rankings. The metrics, as explained yesterday, are designed to recognize those university-based academics who are contributing most substantially to public debates about schools and schooling. The rankings offer a useful, if imperfect, gauge of the public impact edu-scholars had in 2011, factoring in both long-term and shorter-term contributions. The rubric reflects both a scholar's body of academic work--encompassing books, articles, and the degree to which these are cited--and their 2011 footprint on the public discourse. The following table reports the 2012 rankings. Click chart for larger view, with zoom Rankings were restricted ...


Tomorrow in this space, I'll be publishing the 2012 RHSU Edu-Scholar Public Presence Rankings. Today, just like last year, I want to take a few moments to explain what those ratings are about and how they were generated. The exercise starts from two simple premises: 1] ideas matter and 2] people tend to devote more time and energy to those activities which are acknowledged and lauded. The academy today does a passable job of recognizing good disciplinary scholarship but a pretty mediocre job of recognizing scholars who effectively help to move ideas from the pages of barely-read journals into the ...


The opinions expressed in Rick Hess Straight Up are strictly those of the author(s) and do not reflect the opinions or endorsement of Editorial Projects in Education, or any of its publications.

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