February 2014 Archives

This week, a Jeopardy! champion talked about his experiences with racial stereotypes, a gay basketball player shared the significance of the number on his jersey, and a columnist wrote about the great challenge of rural poverty.


The 8,700-student district agreed to review and improve its discipline policies following an investigation that revealed higher discipline rates for black students.


Opponents of a new law that applies to transgender students in California schools failed to gain enough valid signatures to qualify a ballot item that would have given voters a chance to overturn the measure.


The experience of Jonathan Martin, the Miami Dolphins lineman who quit after being repeatedly harassed by teammates, is a cautionary tale about the lasting effect of adolescent bullying.


First lady Michelle Obama, in a White House conference with U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack, unveiled proposed new rules that aim to shield students from junk-food advertising during the school day.


This week, we see how restorative justice works in one high school, read about the perennial issue of controversial mascots, and learn that the mean jokes in NFL locker rooms may resemble the bullying students deal with in school.


A sweeping research review on bullying suggests that bullying may be more common in schools with certain characteristics, such as racial homogeneity.


A Maryland lawmaker introduced a bill that would allow districts to ignore a new state rule, which requires districts to adopt new discipline policies by 2014-15.


A perception of greater threat leads some educators to punish black students more harshly than their white peers, leader of civil rights group says.


UPDATED: Democratic state representative Gail Finney, who introduced the bill, said that the measure was designed to clarify the boundaries of acceptable corporal punishment, which is not expressly defined in current Kansas statutes.


This week, we dig deeper into Chicago school discipline data, meet an ice skater who competes in traditional Muslim dress, and catch up with the cute girl from that iconic Lego ad.


The law will require many districts to provide federally funded meals during their summer programs. It includes an opt-out provision.


The Obama administration's recent school discipline guidance is laudable, but decisions about how to deal with student behavior are best left to local officials, wrote four House Republicans.


There have been at least 28 shootings at K-12 schools and at least 16 shootings at colleges and universities in the 14 months since the Dec. 14, 2012 massacre at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Conn., two-gun control advocacy groups said this week.


Districts in Massachusetts must implement programs that would help suspended or expelled students continue to learn.


While a Maryland district plans to form a Cybercivility Task Force to address inappropriate online postings, the role of schools in addressing such behavior is largely uncharted territory.


A study suggests that school drug-testing policies have no significant impact on deterring students from trying or using drugs, while a positive school climate does.


Children and teens have varied their caffeine sources, turning to energy drinks and coffee as they cut back on caffeinated sodas, a study finds.


A review of existing research showed that roughly half of parents with overweight or obese children believe their children are at a healthy weight.


There have been 14,587 out-of-school suspensions in the district between the beginning of the school year and January, a 36 percent drop from the same time period in 2010-11.


This week, we read about the lifelong struggle of recovery, the grief that follows teen suicide, the joy of forgiveness, and the web of challenges for children in Detroit.


A review of studies of single-sex classrooms found many claims of their value could be attributed to other factors, such as parental income and education levels.


A new research review examines the academic impacts of a wide range of teenage behaviors, from television-watching to early sexual activity to playing sports, and finds that the effects are often mediated by a student's particular social milieu.


A new online campaign is calling on congress to pass a bill that would end the use of corporal punishment in schools.


The Trevor Project, the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention, the American School Counselor Association, and the National Association of School Psychologists collaborated on the document, which includes sample student handbook language.


The nearly $1 trillion bill includes several school nutrition pilot and grant programs.


The rules set hiring and ongoing education requirements for employees who manage and operate National School Lunch and School Breakfast programs.


A federal appeals court will re-examine a case in which an 11-year-old California student who was being unresponsive to school officials was removed in handcuffs.


The bill would prohibit a student from using "a gender-segregated public school bathroom that does not correspond to the student's phenotype."


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