September 2014 Archives

About 100 cities, counties, and tribal communities have said they are going to take the Obama administration up on its new "My Brother's Keeper" initiative community challenge.


Critics of disciplinary infractions like "defiance" and "disruption" say they leave too much to the discretion of educators who often apply them inconsistently between classrooms and sometimes between races.


This week, we read about poor students, gender equality, creative solutions to kids' loneliness, and more.


The U.S. Department of Education found that black students in Tupelo "had been disproportionately subjected to discipline at every stage in the district's discipline process."


Attorney General Eric Holder worked with the U.S. Department of Education to create civil rights guidance on school discipline.


Of the more than 1.2 million homeless children enrolled in public schools in 2012-13, 75 percent were "doubled up," sharing homes with multiple families, data show.


About $70 million in federal grants were awarded through four programs aimed at states and school districts.


Teaching high school students that personality traits are changeable may help counteract a risk of depression, a new study finds.


This week, we dig into the debate over corporal punishment at schools in the wake of the NFL scandal. I also share links about student speech rights, school police, and more.


San Diego's decision follows an announcement by the Los Angeles school police department that it will return three grenade launchers it also received through the 1033 military surplus program.


Civil rights groups have raised concerns about schools receiving surplus military equipment through a U.S. Department of Defense program, which provided the grenade launchers to Los Angeles school police.


The surplus military equipment was provided through a Department of Defense program, which has been criticized following local response to protests in Ferguson, Mo.


T.J. Lane, who killed three students and wounded several others in a 2012 rampage in Chardon, Ohio, was later recaptured.


The $14.7 million in grants aim to expand the range, quality, and availability of counseling services in elementary and secondary schools.


Under the bill, school boards can meet in closed session to designate employees as school protection officers, authorized to "carry a concealed firearm or self-defense spray device."


New "Smart Snacks in Schools" rules limit sales of unhealthy foods in school fundraisers, prompting U.S. Rep. Ted Poe, R-Texas, to complain about "the federal government food police."


The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation is partnering with regional philanthropies to fund efforts that support African American, Latino, and Native American boys and young men living in the South and Southwest.


The official, who oversees the agency in charge of the Lone Star State's school-meal programs, called vegetarian lunches in some districts "an activist movement" in a recent editorial.


This week I recommend links about implicit bias in school discipline, biracial children and their single-race fathers, gender and immigrant men, Ferguson, and the shadow the Newtown tragedy casts over back-to-school season for some parents.


Suspensions for nonviolent behaviors will no longer be allowed for the district's students in prekindergarten through 1st grade.


The U.S. Department of Education previously provided a $1.3 million grant for the 2012-13 school year and a $1.9 million grant for the 2013-14 school year to aid with mental health services for students and broader recovery efforts.


While parents fear disasters at schools, many are uninformed about schools' preparedness efforts, a poll by Save the Children found.


A study by Attendance Works tracks the effects of absences on NAEP scores at a state-by-state level.


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