June 2012 Archives

Great new report out today from the Progressive Policy Institute on the need for charter authorizers to be more assertive in closing down low-performing schools, the practical and political challenges to doing so, and what to do about it. Over the past few years there's been a recognition that, while the charter movement originally promised increased accountability through the ability to shutter low-performing charter schools, too many low-performing charters have been allowed to remain in operation, while students languish. Charter leaders, funders, policymakers and the media have responded to this realization with calls for charter authorizers to get tougher about ...


Dana Goldstein has an interesting Slate piece looking at how states, schools, and districts are assessing children's learning in the performing and visual arts. This is an issue I've struggled with personally in my work as an authorizer--when charter authorizers approve an arts-themed charter school (of which there are many), ideally we want to see that the school is not only delivering student achievement results on state assessments, but that it's also fulfilling its mission to deliver high-quality arts education to students. Identifying appropriate arts-related measures of learning outcomes has proven challenging, however, for both schools and authorizers, so I'm ...


A new report funded by the Max and Marjorie Fisher Foundation looks at the potential benefits of increased pre-k access for the state of Michigan and the city of Detroit. (h/t Eye on Early Education) The researchers find that the total "per-child" savings to the state and residents of Michigan for each additional at-risk child served in pre-k total $32,075--and more than double that in the city of Detroit. I'm all for my home state spending more on pre-k. Goodness knows the kids in Detroit and other parts of the state would benefit. But I'm also always a ...


GothamSchools' Philssa Cramer tries to ferret out what's happening with the New York City Department of Education's special ed reforms. Given the number of kids and amount of money potentially involved if reforms go citywide this fall as planned, this is important stuff. It hasn't gotten much attention outside of D.C. but the resignation Wednesday night of D.C. Council Chairman Kwame Brown has real, but as yet unclear, implications for policies related to both charters and DCPS. WaPo's Bill Turque reviews Brown's record on education and questions his resignation raises for the future....


Five years ago today I was in New York to celebrate the launch of Democrats for Education Reform, an organization on whose board I've been incredibly honored to serve. At that point, I could never imagine what an impact DFER would have in the coming years, including fostering an impressive and growing team of Democratic elected education reformers at the state and local level, raising the profile of ed reform in the 2008 election, providing ground cover for Democratic elected officials supporting the Obama administration's education reforms, creating on the ground presence for Democrat-led education reform in 10 states, and ...


The NYT's David Halbfinger takes a look at high and rising costs of preschool special education in New York City and state. While New York's high costs are a bit of an outlier nationally, special ed pre-k is a significant, but often overlooked part of both state early childhood and special ed systems that deserves increased attention. Under IDEA, preschool-aged children who have been identified with a disability are entitled to special education and related services in the least restrictive environment. In practice, this means that states or school districts must provide preschool for children with disabilities. Nationally, about 8 ...


Plenty of other people have written smart or at least interesting things about the Romney education plan, and I'm not sure I have that much to add, other than that, like Andy, I think the higher ed stuff is a lot more problematic, both as policy and politics, than the K-12 stuff. But I do think it's worth spending a second on Romney's proposals to make Title I and IDEA funds follow kids to the providers of their choice--not because I think this proposal is likely to be realized anytime soon, but because there are some real tensions between the ...


Weren't the next gen leaders awesome? I've got a tough act to follow returning to the blog after turning it over to them for the past month (although they have inspired some reflections I'm hoping to share soon). But nevertheless, I'm going to try. A lot of stuff happened while I was gone: The Department of Education announced Race to the Top for districts Mitt Romney released an education plan The Center for American Progress rolled out some smart ideas for improving federal early childhood programs New ConnCAN analysis of teacher evaluation systems My friend Kevin Carey and his uber-team ...


Advertisement

Recent Comments

Archives

Categories

Technorati

Technorati search

» Blogs that link here

Tags

AFT
Alex Grodd
Ana Menezes
Andrew Kelly
appropriations
ARRA
Aspire Public Schools
authorizing
Better Lesson
Bill Ferguson
certification
charter schools
child care
children's literature
choice
civil rights
CLASS
Core Knowledge
curriculum
D.C.
democracy
early childhood
Early Learning Challenge Grant
economics
elections
English language learners
entrepreneurship
equity
Evan Stone
fathers
finance
fix poverty first
Hailly Korman
harlem children's zone
HEA
Head Start
head start
health care
Higher Education
home-based child care
homeschooling
housing
How we think and talk about pre-k evidence
i3
IDEA
income inequality
instruction
international
Jason Chaffetz
Jen Medbery
just for fun
Justin Cohen
Kaya Henderson
Kenya
kindergarten
KIPP
Kirabo Jackson
Kwame Brown
land use
LearnBoost
libertarians
LIFO
literacy
Los Angeles
Louise Stoney
Mark Zuckerberg
Maryland
Massachusetts
Memphis
Michelle Rhee
Michigan
Mickey Muldoon
Neerav Kingsland
New Jersey
New Orleans
NewtownReaction
Next Gen Leaders
Next Gen leaders
nonsense
NSVF Summit
NYT
organizing
parent engagement
parenting
parking
pell grants
politics
poverty
PreK-3rd
presidents
principals
productivity
QRIS
Race to the Top
Rafael Corrales
redshirting
regulation
religion
rick hess
Roxanna Elden
RTT
san francisco
school choice
social services
SOTU
special education
Stephanie Wilson
stimulus
story
Sydney Morris
tax credits
Teacher Prep
teachers
technology
Title I
unions
urban issues
Vincent Gray
vouchers
Waiting for Superman
Washington
West Virginia
zoning