July 2013 Archives

Simile, analogy, and metaphor can be powerful analytic and writing tools, which is one reason pundits and policy wonks love 'em. But a recent post and tweet by Mike Petrilli on school closures illustrate the risks when policy wonks get too cute with the similes: Is shuttering schools akin to stop & frisk? http://t.co/lepXDfq27T cc @QualityCharters @GregRichmond @Parker_Baxter @saramead @rickhess99— Michael Petrilli (@MichaelPetrilli) July 23, 2013 I don't necessarily agree with the broader point Petrilli is trying to make here about paternalism, but even if one does, the wheels quickly come off the moment you scratch below...


New First Focus report looks at the costs of pre-k or childcare on the private market relative to income and typical household expenditures for families at different income levels. We've long known that childcare or preschool is a major expenditure for the lowest income households--bigger even than rent or housing for many families--but it's also the second biggest cost for middle-class families and can put a major strain on family budgets. The report also flags some interesting differences in types of preschool or childcare used by families at different income levels.Important issues to think about in debates over universal ...


Over the past seven years, New Orleans has experienced a dramatic transformation of the city's public educational system, which has been closely watched nationally as a test of new approaches to organizing and delivering public education. As the Executive Director of Teach for America of Greater New Orleans, Kira Orange Jones has been closely involved in supporting that transformation. In 2011, she ran for and won election to the Louisiana State Board of Education, representing the 2nd BESE District, which includes most of New Orleans. Born and raised in the Bronx, New York, Kira Orange Jones first came to Louisiana ...


Smart post from Matt Yglesias on school segregation and the basic math of our nation's changing child demographics. Since the end of de jure racial segregation, analysis of progress (or, more frequently, lack thereof) in reducing de facto segregation has tended to focus on the percentage of racial and ethnic minority students attending "majority minority" schools. But as the demographic composition of our nation's students has shifted, non-Hispanic white students make up a smaller percentage of children enrolled in our schools, and are in fact a minority of children under aged 5. This basic demographic math will lead to a ...


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