November 2013 Archives

I'm thankful for a lot of things this Thanksgiving, including improved educational outcomes in my hometown of Washington, D.C., the great charter and DCPS educators who have contributed to those trends, and the great teachers who've had a lasting impact on my life (especially my dad and sister!). If you're thankful for teachers in your life, please join the National Alliance for Public Charter Schools in saying thanks this Thanksgiving. I'm also thankful that I'll be taking a little bit of a break to go on vacation the first week in December, but look forward to blogging here on ...


I'd agree with Russ Whitehurst that the latest findings from the independent evaluation of Tennessee's VPK program are hardly good news for universal pre-k advocates. Where I'd disagree is Russ' assertion that this single study represents some kind of devastating blow to the case for pre-k. For at least the past decade, the case for pre-k has been based not on a single study but on a growing body of evidence--from states as diverse as New Jersey and Texas, as well as internationally--that quality early childhood programs have positive results for kids. While it's indeed troubling that the strong results ...


My former colleague Steve Teles has a thought provoking piece in the fall issue of National Affairs arguing that the defining issue of contemporary U.S. domestic policy is not the size of government, but the complexity and incoherence of public programs and policy. This complexity and incoherence, which Teles calls, "kludgeocracy," is the result of both the multiple veto points in our system (which lead to a reliance on temporary, make due patches--or kludges--in response to specific needs or challeges, rather than more coherent and far-reaching solutions), as well as efforts to limit or mask the magnitude of government ...


One of the big questions about pre-k expansion proposals is how to pay for them. I'd posit that the Congressional Budget Office's just-released Summary Table of Options for Reducing the Deficit might be a good place to look for potential savings with which to fund pre-k investments. I'd also suggest that this is one instance where the "pre-k produces savings that can help pay for pre-k investments" argument has some real merit. While research does suggest that high-quality pre-k eventually produces reductions in public costs (for special ed, grade retention, welfare, and incarceration) and increases in revenues (from both increased ...


In my previous posts I described the key features of the pre-k bill released today, as well as what I think is good and not so good about it. But I still have some questions: Do all state pre-k programs have to meet high-quality standards? Section 116(a)(1)(C) of the bill reads "[an assurance that the State] will establish or certify the existence of program standards for all State prekindergarten programs consistent with the definition of a high-quality pre-kindergarten program [included in this bill." Does this mean that, if a state already has a pre-k program in place, ...


In my previous post, I explained some of the key things that the pre-k bills introduced today by Sen. Tom Harkin and Rep. George Miller do. Here are some things to keep an eye on: What's Good: Strong support for diverse delivery. Under this legislation, states that receive pre-k funds would make subgrants to "eligible local entities" to provide pre-k, which could include school districts, charter schools or charter management organizations, community-based early childhood providers, and consortia of these groups. The legislation also would require states to make assurances that they will consider impacts on diverse delivery in making pre-k ...


After months of negotiations and rumors, Senate HELP Committee Chair Tom Harkin (D-Ia.), House Education and Workforce Committee Ranking Member George Miller (D-Calif.), and Rep. Richard Hanna (R-N.Y.) have released proposed legislation to enact the federal-state pre-k partnership proposed by President Obama in this year's State of the Union Address. Here's a quick summary of what the proposed legislation. In my next post, I'll outline key things to look out for: Establishes a program of formula-based federal grants to states to support high-quality pre-k. Eligible states will be able to use the grants to expand access to pre-k for ...


Now that Bill deBlasio is officially the next Mayor of New York City, a few folks have asked me for my take on the universal pre-k proposal that was a centerpiece of his campaign. As is often the case with campaign plans, there's not a lot of detail out there, so I don't have a lot to say. But here are a few key questions: Will the funding come through? As others have noted, deBlasio's proposed funding mechanism for pre-k, a tax increase on high-income New Yorkers, requires approval in Albany. That's not out of the question, but it's also ...


A smart new College Summit paper by my colleagues Andrew Rotherham and Chad Aldeman, with JB Schramm, Jordan Cross, and Rachael Brown, calls dookey on the "are we sending too many people to college?" and "is college a bad investment" debates (long story short: the answer to both questions is no). Unlike those debates, which tend to traffic in anecdotes, extremes, and scare tactics, this new paper is chock-full of fascinating and informative data points (did you know that plumbers with a college degree make 39 percent more than those without?). Key takeaway: since postsecondary credentials are increasingly necessary for ...


Great blog post from the Albert Shanker Institute's Esther Quintero pegs off of recent news coverage of the "word gap" in young children's early language exposure and vocabulary to highlight the need to strategically support young children in developing both a broad vocabulary and background knowledge. In other words--it's not enough for adults to simply talk more to kids; how they talk matters! I highly recommend reading the whole post, which gets into nuances of supporting young children's learning that are really critical but largely lacking from our current public and policy dialogue about supporting young children's learning. I'm particularly ...


Advertisement

Recent Comments

Archives

Categories

Technorati

Technorati search

» Blogs that link here

Tags

AFT
Alex Grodd
Ana Menezes
Andrew Kelly
appropriations
ARRA
Aspire Public Schools
authorizing
Better Lesson
Bill Ferguson
certification
charter schools
child care
children's literature
choice
civil rights
CLASS
Core Knowledge
curriculum
D.C.
democracy
early childhood
Early Learning Challenge Grant
economics
elections
English language learners
entrepreneurship
equity
Evan Stone
fathers
finance
fix poverty first
Hailly Korman
harlem children's zone
HEA
Head Start
head start
health care
Higher Education
home-based child care
homeschooling
housing
How we think and talk about pre-k evidence
i3
IDEA
income inequality
instruction
international
Jason Chaffetz
Jen Medbery
just for fun
Justin Cohen
Kaya Henderson
Kenya
kindergarten
KIPP
Kirabo Jackson
Kwame Brown
land use
LearnBoost
libertarians
LIFO
literacy
Los Angeles
Louise Stoney
Mark Zuckerberg
Maryland
Massachusetts
Memphis
Michelle Rhee
Michigan
Mickey Muldoon
Neerav Kingsland
New Jersey
New Orleans
NewtownReaction
Next Gen Leaders
Next Gen leaders
nonsense
NSVF Summit
NYT
organizing
parent engagement
parenting
parking
pell grants
politics
poverty
PreK-3rd
presidents
principals
productivity
QRIS
Race to the Top
Rafael Corrales
redshirting
regulation
religion
rick hess
Roxanna Elden
RTT
san francisco
school choice
social services
SOTU
special education
Stephanie Wilson
stimulus
story
Sydney Morris
tax credits
Teacher Prep
teachers
technology
Title I
unions
urban issues
Vincent Gray
vouchers
Waiting for Superman
Washington
West Virginia
zoning